Community congress – Citrus Congress 2012 http://citruscongress2012.org/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 10:17:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://citruscongress2012.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Community congress – Citrus Congress 2012 http://citruscongress2012.org/ 32 32 Commentary: A bold new model for climate action https://citruscongress2012.org/commentary-a-bold-new-model-for-climate-action/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/commentary-a-bold-new-model-for-climate-action/ As climate disasters strike state after state, fossil fuel-funded members of Congress are focused on a false choice between economic prosperity and tackling climate change. Meanwhile, politicians’ rhetoric about the devastating impact of climate change on communities of color adds insult to injury. Through a neighborhood coalition from a program called Transformative Climate Communities, 800 […]]]>

As climate disasters strike state after state, fossil fuel-funded members of Congress are focused on a false choice between economic prosperity and tackling climate change. Meanwhile, politicians’ rhetoric about the devastating impact of climate change on communities of color adds insult to injury.

Through a neighborhood coalition from a program called Transformative Climate Communities, 800 homes in Stockton, Calif., Above, will benefit from energy and water efficiency improvements, with local youth trained to make work. Solar energy systems will be installed at four affordable multi-family housing sites, as well as for 108 low-income single-family home owners. Terrance Emerson / Dreamstime.com via TNS

There is a better way: California has quietly come up with a new approach that should be taken nationally.

We know that because we helped make it happen.

The program is called Transformative Climate Communities. It uses climate action to build prosperous and prosperous communities, focusing on neighborhoods facing the greatest environmental and economic challenges. And, unlike most government programs, it allows communities themselves to lead.

In Stockton, California, as in many communities, the legacy of environmental racism persists. Latin American, black and Asian neighborhoods have been devastated by a cross highway that has divided communities and added to the pollution from heavy industry and the port of Stockton. The historic divestment has left the region with deteriorating infrastructure, poverty and unemployment.

This is typical, thanks to the legacy of redlining – policies that have separated communities of color and deprived them of financial investment.

Government programs to address these problems have generally been too small, too fragmented, and imposed from top to bottom on communities. Transformative Climate Communities does almost everything differently.

The program funds communities to develop neighborhood-wide climate plans based on priorities set by residents themselves. Its structure is based on deep and ongoing community leadership – with government support, not dictating. Transformative Climate Communities then provides implementation grants to make those dreams come true.

While governments typically put energy, transportation, and housing policies in their own silos, the program creates connected plans that bring these and other elements together.

For example, this could involve building affordable, energy-efficient and solar-powered housing near transit stops, upgrading and upgrading that transit system while adding improvements for bicycles. and pedestrians who help residents access these transportation stops. And it can go further by lining these cycle and pedestrian paths with trees that remove carbon from the air and reduce urban “heat island” effects.

Transformative Climate Communities also needs projects to create well-paying jobs and economic opportunities for residents, as well as an anti-displacement strategy so residents can reap the benefits without being evicted.

In Stockton, the Greenlining Institute worked with local residents, community leaders and the Mayor’s office to develop a Transformative Climate Communities app with support from the City Manager. An emerging coalition called Rise Stockton was awarded nearly $ 11 million to begin implementation.

Residents, through a process that included 25 community meetings, door-to-door, surveys and more, created a sustainable neighborhood plan. While the implementation grant was less than residents hoped, it was sufficient to fund many urgent projects.

For example, 800 homes will receive water and energy efficiency upgrades, with local youth trained to do the job. City staff and volunteers will plant 1,750 trees, and solar power systems will be installed at four affordable multi-family sites, as well as for 108 low-income single-family homeowners.

When the Greenlining Institute recently analyzed the impact of transformative climate communities, the program’s potential to change the entire climate debate became clear: it can move us forward towards our climate goals while enabling communities to build a climate. healthy and prosperous future according to their own priorities. Transformative climate communities should be replicated nationally.

We don’t have to choose between protecting our climate and building prosperity in communities too often overlooked by government. We know how to do both.

If we are serious about building back better, Transformative Climate Communities has shown us how. Congress should take notes.


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BJP and Congress woo MP’s tribal community ahead of election https://citruscongress2012.org/bjp-and-congress-woo-mps-tribal-community-ahead-of-election/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 10:24:54 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/bjp-and-congress-woo-mps-tribal-community-ahead-of-election/ The BJP and Congress are expected to woo the Madhya Pradesh tribal community ahead of the upcoming 2023 Panchayat, Urban Body and Assembly elections. Madhya Pradesh has a large tribal population (around 21 percent). Therefore, both parties are eyeing the tribal vote bank to win the election. Of the 84 assembly constituencies where tribals are […]]]>

The BJP and Congress are expected to woo the Madhya Pradesh tribal community ahead of the upcoming 2023 Panchayat, Urban Body and Assembly elections.

Madhya Pradesh has a large tribal population (around 21 percent). Therefore, both parties are eyeing the tribal vote bank to win the election.

Of the 84 assembly constituencies where tribals are abundant, the BJP won 34 in the 2018 parliamentary elections, while in 2013 it won 59 constituencies. Thus, the party lost 25 seats in 2018.

In 2013, out of a total of 47 State Assembly constituencies, reserved for tribals, the BJP won 31 seats, while Congress won 15. While in the 2018 elections, the BJP did not won only 16 seats and Congress won 30 seats.

From then on, the BJP is now trying to bridge the gap that cost it first place in the 2018 polls by bringing the state’s tribals back into its fold.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi delivered a speech in Madhya Pradesh on November 15 as the BJP celebrated Tribal Pride Day on the anniversary of the birth of Birsa Munda, a tribal chief.

A grand closing ceremony is also scheduled in Mandla on November 22 to mark the end of Tribal Pride Week. Likewise, on the day of Tantya Bhil’s sacrifice on December 4, a program will take place in Patalpani d’Indore.

Meanwhile, Congress, which is also trying to maintain support, hosted a meeting of lawmakers and tribal leaders in Bhopal on November 24.

The growing efforts and intensified campaigns by both sides to secure their tribal vote bank prove that the community has the power to swing elections in the state.

(To receive our electronic paper daily on WhatsApp, please click here. We allow sharing of the PDF document on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)

Posted on: Sunday November 21, 2021 3:54 PM IST


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Faith in Action: November 21, 2021 – Urge Congress to Support the Afghan Adjustment Act https://citruscongress2012.org/faith-in-action-november-21-2021-urge-congress-to-support-the-afghan-adjustment-act/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 12:55:41 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/faith-in-action-november-21-2021-urge-congress-to-support-the-afghan-adjustment-act/ Each week at All Saints Church, we put our faith into action. This week, we sign a letter to our members of Congress urging them to support the introduction and passage of the Afghan Adjustment Act. Over the past few weeks, several thousand Afghans have arrived in the United States and many more are being […]]]>

Each week at All Saints Church, we put our faith into action. This week, we sign a letter to our members of Congress urging them to support the introduction and passage of the Afghan Adjustment Act.

Over the past few weeks, several thousand Afghans have arrived in the United States and many more are being processed and checked at US military bases abroad. Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMMs) and other refugee resettlement agencies have taken enormous steps to resettle these arrivals. While Congress passed a law that increases the number of Afghan arrivals eligible for refugee resettlement benefits and provided EMM with funding to assist with the resettlement of these people, long-term legal and administrative hurdles remain that prevent the full integration of our new neighbors.

In response to these challenges, we renew our appeal to Congress to present and pass an Afghan adjustment law that would create a specific program allowing all Afghan arrivals to apply directly for a green card without having to go through others. channels such as the asylum system. .

This problem is particularly acute for Afghans who arrived through a process known as humanitarian parole. On parole, Afghans can enter and remain in the United States like their compatriots who arrive through other programs such as the Special Immigration Visa (SIV) and the United States refugee admission programs. While the latter two programs provide dedicated channels for Afghans to apply for a green card, those arriving on parole are granted temporary status that does not have these dedicated channels. Instead, these people must find other ways to apply for a green card, including applying through the asylum program which has a large backlog of cases that can leave these people waiting for their cases to be resolved for years. .

Taking the measures proposed in the Afghan Adjustment Act would continue to promote the full social and economic integration of newcomers to the United States, including refugees seeking protection in the United States, having laid the groundwork for the successful integration of our allies. Afghans.

Options for signing:

  1. Sign a letter to the Action Table on Sunday morning.
  2. Download a PDF copy of the letter to sign and mail.

THEletter used at the action table. Letter used for those outside of California.

  1. Click on this link to sign an online petition.

If you ever need to search for your US House of Representatives member or US Senators, check here: www.house.gov and www.senate.gov.

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Support the resettlement of refugees

Episcopal Migration Ministries, the Episcopal Church’s refugee resettlement and migration ministry, is currently working in partnership with the U.S. government to assist Afghan SIVs and other newcomers to resettle and provide direct services through a network of 11 affiliates across the United States. and resettle Afghans in the United States through our affiliate network and engagement programs, housing assistance continues to be the greatest need. Those who wish to financially support these efforts can donate online here or donate by mail and send checks to:

DFMS-Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States
BP 958983
Saint-Louis, MO 63195-8983
(Include “episcopal migration ministries and Afghan SIVs” in the line of the memo)

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If you are interested in volunteering or community sponsorship opportunities to support our Afghan allies, please complete this interest form. Finally, information for Afghan nationals on resettlement efforts is available here. We thank everyone for offering their support as Episcopal Migration Ministries do this vital work.


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Black residents want more representation in Louisiana congressional delegation https://citruscongress2012.org/black-residents-want-more-representation-in-louisiana-congressional-delegation/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 14:50:08 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/black-residents-want-more-representation-in-louisiana-congressional-delegation/ Jacquelyn Germany, from Black Baton Rouge, is “sick and tired of not being fairly represented in Congress.” Germany and several other black residents of Louisiana told state lawmakers that Louisiana’s black population – which makes up one-third of the state – should be better reflected in the state’s congressional delegation. About a third of Louisiana’s […]]]>

Jacquelyn Germany, from Black Baton Rouge, is “sick and tired of not being fairly represented in Congress.”

Germany and several other black residents of Louisiana told state lawmakers that Louisiana’s black population – which makes up one-third of the state – should be better reflected in the state’s congressional delegation.

About a third of Louisiana’s population is black and predominantly Democratic, but only one of Louisiana’s six congressmen – Representative Troy Carter – is either black or a Democrat. The rest of the delegation is made up of white Republicans. Black residents like Germany have said the representation is unbalanced because the state’s political lines have been drawn for the benefit of Republicans.

“The time has come for fair cards. It’s time for fair representation. It’s time to make a difference, ”said Germany.

She and other residents testified Tuesday before the government affairs committee of the Louisiana Legislature at a public meeting on the redistribution of the political borders of the State at the University of the South in Baton Rouge. It was the fifth of ten hearings committees are holding around the state on political redistribution.

With new data from the U.S. census, the legislature will adjust political constituencies for its members of Congress, the Louisiana legislature, the state school board, and the Civil Service Commission for the next ten years. These adjustments will be pulled at an extraordinary redistribution session in early 2022.

Louisiana’s 2nd Congressional District, represented by Carter, is drawn to include parts of the New Orleans subway and Baton Rouge, the two largest cities in the state. Both cities also have a predominantly black population.

Many speakers believe Baton Rouge and New Orleans should be completely divided into at least two different congressional districts – which could give more black and Democratic candidates a shot at being elected.

Arielle McTootie, a lawyer with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, said black residents would have “an equal chance of electing their preferred congressional candidates” if congressional districts were redesigned to fairly represent minorities.

“A map that includes all of Baton Rouge in a majority black second district would keep this community intact and allow Baton Rouge residents to participate equally in the political process,” McTootie said.

Rep. John Stefanski, a Crowley Republican and one of the lawmakers spearheading redistribution efforts, said he had heard “all kinds of considerations” about how to redesign political ridings from other lawmakers.

“Every committee member is interested in Congress and has an idea of ​​what Congress should look like for them,” Stefanski said.

Political affiliation will be a factor in the redistribution process. Republicans have gained more power in the Louisiana Legislature since the last redistribution session in 2011. Democrats fear the new lines will be biased further in favor of the Conservatives.

Republicans hold a super-majority in the Louisiana Senate, but Governor John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, has the right to veto political district maps, giving his party some political clout.

When asked if Edwards would approve a political district map that would not have two predominantly black congressional districts, Stefanski said there had been no communication between his committee and the governor’s office.

“I don’t know and I don’t want to speculate on it,” Stefanski said.


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Oncologists warn Congress cancer care held hostage by rebuilding better drug pricing arrangements https://citruscongress2012.org/oncologists-warn-congress-cancer-care-held-hostage-by-rebuilding-better-drug-pricing-arrangements/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 20:08:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/oncologists-warn-congress-cancer-care-held-hostage-by-rebuilding-better-drug-pricing-arrangements/ Logo of the Oncology Community Alliance COA urges technical fixes to remove medics from mid-negotiations and end BBB’s unintended collateral damage to U.S. cancer system Doctors and their patients should not be held hostage by the BBB as it is currently drafted. – Ted Okon, COA WASHINGTON, DC, USA, Nov 15, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – The […]]]>

Logo of the Oncology Community Alliance

COA urges technical fixes to remove medics from mid-negotiations and end BBB’s unintended collateral damage to U.S. cancer system

Doctors and their patients should not be held hostage by the BBB as it is currently drafted.

– Ted Okon, COA

WASHINGTON, DC, USA, Nov 15, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – The Community Oncology Alliance (COA), a national non-profit organization representing independent oncology practices and the patients they serve, warns the Congress that the way the drug pricing provisions in the current Build Back Better (BBB) ​​bill are implemented threatens the cancer care system and needs to be corrected.

COA calls on Congress to amend the BBB with technical fixes so that cancer care providers are not held hostage in drug price negotiations between the government and drug makers. The drug pricing provisions in the current BBB bill are implemented in such a way that oncologists and other physicians administering chemotherapy and similar specialty drugs in Medicare Part B are placed in the midst of negotiations over drug prices between government and drug manufacturers.

Without correcting the BBB, Medicare reimbursement for drugs will be lower than the acquisition cost, while also having a negative impact on commercial reimbursement, which is simply not sustainable. The bill will have the unintended consequences of fueling independent practice closures, bringing more care into the much more expensive hospital setting and reducing access to patients, especially in rural or underserved areas.

“Doctors and their patients should not be held hostage by the BBB as it is currently written,” said Ted Okon, executive director of the COA, and stressed that the BBB law would have dire consequences if it were not was not corrected. “Cancer patients have been the real victims of nearly two decades of federal policy making that decimated our nation’s community oncology system. In some communities, there is no longer a low-cost, high-quality independent oncology practice, but instead, patients are forced into the much more expensive hospital system. The irony should not escape anyone that while the BBB tries to bring down the prices of drugs for Americans with cancer and other diseases, the way it is implemented will do the exact opposite – increase the costs of drugs. medications. “

The COA calls on Congress to correct the BBB by requiring drug manufacturers to reimburse the government directly for additional costs in excess of the negotiated price or the “maximum fair price” (MFP). This creates a direct transaction between government and drug makers, without putting unnecessary pressure on independent physicians, such as community oncology practices, who are already struggling to provide high-quality, affordable cancer care to patients in their communities. communities across the country. Any tariff concession should be exempted from the calculation of the average selling price (AVP) by manufacturers so that supplier payment rates are not artificially reduced. Including them risks a lethal repayment spiral to unsustainable levels.

Oncologists wholeheartedly agree that the cost of cancer care in the United States is too high and support efforts to fix the system. This should include tackling unsustainable prices for cancer treatments and adjunctive therapies, the destructive impact of pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), and enthusiastic support for efforts to reform the delivery of cancer care. However, Congress must be careful with the unintended consequences of poorly written technical language in major legislation.

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About the Community Oncology Alliance: The majority of Americans battling cancer receive treatment through community oncology. Keeping patients close to their homes, families and support networks reduces the impact of this devastating disease. Community-based oncology practices do this while providing cutting-edge, high-quality cancer care at a fraction of the cost of a hospital setting. The Community Oncology Alliance (COA) advocates for community oncology and smart public policies that ensure the community cancer care system remains healthy and able to provide all Americans with access to local cancer care, quality and affordable. Learn more at www.CommunityOncology.org. Follow COA on Twitter at www.twitter.com/oncologieCOA or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CommunityOncologyAlliance.

Nicolas ferreyros
Community Alliance in Oncology
write us here



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mathematician from UCSB invited to speak at the International Congress of Mathematics | UCSB https://citruscongress2012.org/mathematician-from-ucsb-invited-to-speak-at-the-international-congress-of-mathematics-ucsb/ https://citruscongress2012.org/mathematician-from-ucsb-invited-to-speak-at-the-international-congress-of-mathematics-ucsb/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 23:51:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/mathematician-from-ucsb-invited-to-speak-at-the-international-congress-of-mathematics-ucsb/ Xin zhou Every four years, mathematicians from all over the world come together for the International Conference on Mathematics. Hosted by the International Mathematical Union, the conference is the largest of its kind. Prestigious accolades such as the Fields Medals, Nevanlinna Prize, Gauss Prize and Chern Medal are awarded at the opening ceremony. Associate professor […]]]>

Xin zhou

Every four years, mathematicians from all over the world come together for the International Conference on Mathematics. Hosted by the International Mathematical Union, the conference is the largest of its kind. Prestigious accolades such as the Fields Medals, Nevanlinna Prize, Gauss Prize and Chern Medal are awarded at the opening ceremony.

Associate professor Xin Zhou, surveyor at UC Santa Barbara, is among the researchers invited to speak at the union’s 2022 event in St. Petersburg, Russia.

“Being invited to speak at the ICM can be a source of pride for the rest of your career,” said Stephen Bigelow, chair of the mathematics department. “We are happy and proud that Xin has achieved this great recognition.”

Zhou will talk about minimal surfaces, surfaces with constant mean curvature and the relationship between the two. He plans to focus in particular on how the two are related by his proof of the multiplicity one conjecture.

Minimum surfaces are those which satisfy certain equations while maintaining the minimum possible surface under local disturbances. These surfaces are mathematical models for soap films and soap bubbles, because the surface tension of the liquid produces shapes with as little surface area as possible under the constraints of the enclosed volume.

Minimal surfaces are fascinating phenomena in themselves, and also have applications in materials science and general relativity.

“Since these equations appear naturally in science, mathematicians are interested in solving them,” Zhou explained. However, unlike a line, parabola, or many other familiar shapes, there is no explicit formula that describes these surfaces. They must be implicitly derived in a more abstract way.

In the 1930s, mathematicians discovered solutions for surfaces with a simple closed boundary where the curvature was zero. These local solutions worked for flat, crimped sheets with edging, like a soap film covering a ring of yarn bubbles. In the 1980s, researchers had proved the existence of at least one closed solution, or a minimal surface without border.

Zhou sought to generalize this theory to produce closed surfaces with constant average curvature, like soap bubbles. It is much more difficult because there are less constraints on the solutions. And in math, more freedoms often lead to more headaches.

Mathematicians have found success after many years of work, finding a strategy to prove the existence of infinite solutions to this equation. Still, they encountered a problem. Many seemingly separate solutions were simply multiple copies of a previous solution. This was tantamount to saying that, say, the movie “Forrest Gump” watched back to back is a different movie than the one watched one time.

In recent years, two of Zhou’s colleagues have formulated a hypothesis: the Multiplicity One Conjecture. He proposed that there was a way to produce solutions to the equation that always included a single copy of the minimal surface.

In January 2019, Zhou finally produced evidence, describing a method that could generate these true solutions. The following month, he received a scholarship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in recognition of his promising early career accomplishments. He added it to his NSF career award.

“I think people like my job not only because I solved the guesswork, but because it wasn’t an isolated discovery,” Zhou said. “The solution forms a series with my work on minimal surfaces with constant positive curvature. “

Zhou appreciates all the support he has received at UCSB. “Most of my important research was done as an assistant professor in the mathematics department at UCSB,” he said. “I would like to express my gratitude to my colleagues, especially Professor Guofang Wei, for their support. “

Zhou is delighted to showcase his achievements primarily as a way to encourage young mathematicians. “I want to inspire some of the students in the department,” he said.

He wants to show them that the work done at UCSB attracts the attention of other members of the community. “If I was a student, seeing someone’s success in the department would make me excited and more motivated to get into work in my own field.

The 2022 International Mathematics Conference will be held in July.


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Cobb community activists say second round of COVID relief funds should benefit those most in need https://citruscongress2012.org/cobb-community-activists-say-second-round-of-covid-relief-funds-should-benefit-those-most-in-need/ https://citruscongress2012.org/cobb-community-activists-say-second-round-of-covid-relief-funds-should-benefit-those-most-in-need/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 14:49:41 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/cobb-community-activists-say-second-round-of-covid-relief-funds-should-benefit-those-most-in-need/ By Arielle Robinson Two local and longtime Cobb community activists say they would like to see the next round of federal funds from the 2021 American Rescue Plan Act move towards a county plan to promote equity. Congress adopted ARPA in March. The intention of the law is to help state, local and tribal governments […]]]>

By Arielle Robinson

Two local and longtime Cobb community activists say they would like to see the next round of federal funds from the 2021 American Rescue Plan Act move towards a county plan to promote equity.

Congress adopted ARPA in March. The intention of the law is to help state, local and tribal governments manage the economic and social costs of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On Friday, October 29, Cobb County launched its ARPA Community Needs Survey in an electronic newsletter, which was reprinted by the Courier a few days later.

The aim of the survey, available in English or Spanish, is to gather feedback on what Cobb residents would like the county to allocate from its roughly $ 147 million in federal aid.

The $ 147 million is split into two payment periods.

In May, Cobb received $ 73,824,239 from ARPA and will receive the same amount again in 2022.

The survey takes approximately 5-10 minutes to complete and addresses four categories: supporting water, sewer and stormwater infrastructure, reducing negative economic impact, supporting public health response, and providing a premium for essential workers.

“The survey will help the county reflect the community’s priorities in its plan to invest funds between these eligible uses,” the county announcement said. “… Each survey response will help shape an investment strategy that meets the highest needs of the community. Hard copies of surveys are available to everyone Cobb Senior Services Multipurpose Centers. “

Sally Riddle and Cobb Southern Christian Leadership President Dr Ben Williams, community activists who have worked on a multitude of social justice issues, from police brutality to prison and immigration reform and beyond, said they were concerned about fairness in the county.

They would like Cobb to use his ARPA funds to help marginalized communities in the county.

They feel encouraged by a federal government that has expressed its intention to ensure social justice for the poor, the LGBTQ community, people of color and other historically oppressed groups.

In particular, they emphasize the first decree President Joe Biden signed in January titled “Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government.”

Executive Order 13985 directs the federal government to review its agencies and programs for racial, gender, wealth and other inequalities. After the review process, agencies must determine the solutions that best address these inequalities.

Section 6 of the EO suggests that the federal government allocate resources “to address the historic failure to invest sufficiently, fairly and equitably in underserved communities, as well as in the individuals of those communities.”

Agencies have one year to collect data on various inequalities and develop a plan that attempts to compensate for the inequalities.

Riddle and Williams’ views are also inspired by the county’s written pledge to fight racism.

Last year, amid international protests against the murder of George Floyd by police, Cobb’s board of commissioners unanimously passed a anti-racist resolution in which the Council said it would actively engage in “providing an environment that supports civil rights for all”.

In light of this local and federal government legislation, Riddle said now would be a “perfect opportunity to really help offset some of this inequality.”

Riddle spoke about the shortage of child care workers and how ARPA funds can help in this area.

“Is there a way for our county government to use some of these funds to provide wage subsidies to child care workers or income-based subsidies for families so they can get on? allow child care so they can return to work? Riddle said.

Riddle also mentioned the allocation of more funds to mental health.

She said the Cobb County Community Service Board, which provides mental health resources, is stressed about staffing levels and their ability to respond.

Residents should have easier ways to access these mental health services, Riddle said.

Even from the perspective of what on the surface may not appear to be a social justice issue – infrastructure improvements – could be used to address disparities, Riddle said.

“We could target these infrastructure improvements in the most needy areas of our county,” she said. “… there are just a myriad of ways that if we really think in a creative and original way, we could use some of these funds.” “

Williams is part of a study group of people from seven southeastern states looking at Biden’s EO, ARPA funds, and how the states intend to spend the money.

Williams said fairness, rather than equality, is the “new wake-up call.”

Williams explained the difference between fairness and equality with an analogy:

“The similarity does not change the status quo. If you and I try to get downtown by bus – and that’s the goal – and the bus ticket costs $ 1, you have 75 cents and I have 50 cents, the fair distribution of resources would be up to you. give a quarter, now you have $ 1 and I get 50 cents, because the point is that we both get downtown. If we treated this equally, you’d get a quarter and say, “I’ll see you later, Ben.” Because I would have a quarter that would make me 75 cents, and I would always be missing a quarter. This is equality.

Williams added to the issues he thinks federal funds could be allocated to. Workers could receive a living wage, including an improvement in living standards, he said.

“We know that there are food deserts [in our county]”Williams said.” We look at our county, where we recognize that there is no easy access to a bank. You look at our county, where our transportation needs are more evident [in certain parts of the county] than other parts of the county. You look at our county where some people are more dependent on public transport than in other places. Equality won’t fix that, fairness will.

Williams said the county should be responsible for the money and spend it in a way that people of color can have more resources at their disposal, as they are often the hardest hit by socio-economic issues.

“We have a Housing office … Which needs to be resourced so that it can do the job the housing authorities have been put in place for, ”said Williams.

He also said the county should invest in the community to produce more mixed income housing. He said more houses were being built, but they remained unaffordable for working-class and low-income people.

Williams acknowledged that the county has and continues to work to help marginalized communities with some progress – albeit little, in his opinion.

For example, in June, the BOC vote allocate more than $ 1.5 million in ARPA funds for food aid. The county recommended that the money go to local nonprofits to distribute the food.

Like Riddle, Williams believes that ARPA funds can come out for the underprivileged in dramatic ways.

Cobb County recently hired a group of consultants, Deloitte Consulting LLP, to determine the optimal ways to spend federal aid.

According to the agenda item concerning the hiring of a consultant, “negotiations were conducted with the company to reach an acceptable working framework and fees. The terms of the contract include nine deliverables to be completed within 12 months for an amount of $ 2,788,000 and these charges will be paid from ARPA funds the county has already received.

Something Riddle would like to see clarified is the consultant group’s plan for community input beyond the survey.

She fears that Cobb’s most disadvantaged people – the people who would benefit the most if ARPA funds were directed to them – might not be aware of or have access to the investigation. This may result in the exclusion of their crucial contribution.

“How will this consulting firm obtain the contribution that would be adequate, representative, of our various communities in the county? Riddle asked. “We have Asian communities, we have Latin American communities – are they going to do anything in Spanish? … How will they analyze this data? And what kind of timeline do they envision for getting feedback to the Council of Commissioners? And will there be capacity for community input when there is a draft plan of what to do with the money? “

Riddle also expressed concern about the Monday, November 22 deadline for responding to the poll. She says the schedule is too short, especially in light of the holidays.

So far, around 200 people have responded to the survey, Cobb County communications director Ross Cavitt said.

Of the timeline, Cavitt said the county plans to extend the investigation deadline until early December. County officials will hold another meeting in the coming week to determine a specific date.

Regarding the accessibility of the survey, Cavitt replied, “It is available online and we are working through our senior centers to distribute hard copies of the survey to their centers and they will be present at various county events in the coming weeks to disseminate more information. We will also likely send copies to people who indicate they do not have online access. “

Finally, Cavitt said the survey is just the first of multiple opportunities that residents will have the opportunity to voice their opinions on how the county should spend ARPA funds.

“[Deloitte is] are currently holding sessions with commissioners, then they will meet with nonprofits and small businesses in the county, ”Cavitt said. “Once the online survey is complete, we will schedule a series of public events (some in collaboration with commissioners). We haven’t announced any of this yet as we are only in the second week of planning.

Arielle Robinson is a student at Kennesaw State University. She is the current Chair of the Academic Section of the Society of Professional Journalists and former Editor-in-Chief of KSU Sentinel. She enjoys music, reading poetry and non-fiction books, and collecting books and records. She enjoys all kinds of music and read poetry and non-fiction books.


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Lafayette activists go to Congress to talk about racial disparities in Louisiana https://citruscongress2012.org/lafayette-activists-go-to-congress-to-talk-about-racial-disparities-in-louisiana/ https://citruscongress2012.org/lafayette-activists-go-to-congress-to-talk-about-racial-disparities-in-louisiana/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 02:32:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/lafayette-activists-go-to-congress-to-talk-about-racial-disparities-in-louisiana/ WASHINGTON, DC – Campaigners at Village 337 are asking for help from members of the Congressional Black Caucus on behalf of the families of victims killed by police in Louisiana. KATC sat down with the mother of Dontronner Robinson, who was killed in a drug raid by police 8 years ago, and allegedly swallowed drugs […]]]>

WASHINGTON, DC – Campaigners at Village 337 are asking for help from members of the Congressional Black Caucus on behalf of the families of victims killed by police in Louisiana.

KATC sat down with the mother of Dontronner Robinson, who was killed in a drug raid by police 8 years ago, and allegedly swallowed drugs during a raid; However, she wants the case to be reopened due to the injuries found during her son’s autopsy.

“I want the laws to change because we are living under the old laws and so that no one can hide anything or if it happens to another family I want something done right away,” Casa said. Bean, who spoke in caucus on behalf of her son and explains why she chose to sue the Black Caucus in Washington to change the laws.

After meeting with the Black Caucus, activists tell us they are pushing, along with Congress, for the Justice Department to conduct a “model practice review” on law enforcement in Louisiana.

“So when you talk about role models,” says Devon Norman, president and director of Village 337, “we’re talking literally. For such a long time, they are not controlled. these patterns affect several cases. “

His community organization, and the family of Ronald Greene and “Trun” Robinson, have shared recent grievances over racial disparities in Louisiana and police brutality.

One of the disparities they mentioned to the Black Caucus was the sacking of former Lafayette Police Chief Thomas Glover.

Angela Kately Eaglin, Vice President of Village 337, said: “I told them former Chief Glover had been fired. , we have informed members of Congress of these particular cases. “

Ron Haley, attorney for Dontronner’s mother, says he thinks it’s difficult to hold law enforcement accountable for the way the laws are made: to administer any kind of sanctions or disciplined.

The Congressional Black Caucus intends to keep the group involved in the investigative process. They plan to invite them again to Washington in the coming months.

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Ohio’s two new members of Congress take their seats https://citruscongress2012.org/ohios-two-new-members-of-congress-take-their-seats/ https://citruscongress2012.org/ohios-two-new-members-of-congress-take-their-seats/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 04:35:01 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/ohios-two-new-members-of-congress-take-their-seats/ WASHINGTON – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sworn in two Ohioans on Thursday as members of the United States House of Representatives. Representatives Shontel Brown, a Democrat, and Mike Carey, a Republican, take the House to 221-213. They won their respective seats on Tuesday and were sworn in immediately as the seats were vacant. “I came […]]]>

WASHINGTON – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sworn in two Ohioans on Thursday as members of the United States House of Representatives.

Representatives Shontel Brown, a Democrat, and Mike Carey, a Republican, take the House to 221-213. They won their respective seats on Tuesday and were sworn in immediately as the seats were vacant.

“I came to Congress because I believe in the resilience of the community that I love and call home,” Brown said on her first floor. speech. “With the eyes of history on us, it’s time for a fairer and more equitable future. “

Brown thanked her friend and mentor, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Marcia Fudge, who resigned from the 11th District seat Brown won this week to lead the agency.

Brown is chairman of the Cuyahoga County Democratic Party. When she was elected, she was backed by establishment Democrats like Hillary Clinton and Rep. House Democratic Whip Jim Clyburn of South Carolina.

In the primary, she beat candidates, including her closest opponent, Nina Turner, a former state senator and progressive Democrat who aided Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), In her presidential campaign.

Brown will also become the 58th member of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Carey will replace Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), who resigned from the 15th district seat in May to lead the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. Carey is a former coal lobbyist who had the backing of former President Donald Trump.

“The problems facing our nation today are great and consequent,” he said during his first speech in the House. “Working families need this organization to provide solutions. Today I am ready to work for the people of my district and for this great nation.

There is still one vacant room in Florida’s 20th District after Alcee Hastings, a Democrat, died in April. General elections take place on January 11.

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Native American Heritage Month celebrates Indigenous communities across the country https://citruscongress2012.org/native-american-heritage-month-celebrates-indigenous-communities-across-the-country/ https://citruscongress2012.org/native-american-heritage-month-celebrates-indigenous-communities-across-the-country/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 04:24:14 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/native-american-heritage-month-celebrates-indigenous-communities-across-the-country/ November is Native American Heritage Month, and for Indigenous peoples across the country, it’s a chance to share the unique ancestry, traditions and contributions their communities make today and have made throughout history. . “Far too often in our founding days and for centuries that have followed, our nation’s promise has been denied to Native […]]]>

November is Native American Heritage Month, and for Indigenous peoples across the country, it’s a chance to share the unique ancestry, traditions and contributions their communities make today and have made throughout history. .

“Far too often in our founding days and for centuries that have followed, our nation’s promise has been denied to Native Americans who have lived on this land from time immemorial,” President Joe Biden said in the proclamation naming the month. of November of Native American heritage. .

“Despite a painful history marked by unjust federal policies of assimilation and elimination, the Native American and Native peoples of Alaska have persevered,” he added.

Biden signed a proclamation on October 28, proclaiming November National Native American Heritage Month.

It gives a national spotlight to Indigenous peoples, communities, and organizations as they work to educate and share stories about tribal nations across the United States.

“During National Native American Heritage Month, we celebrate the countless contributions of Indigenous peoples past and present, honor the influence they have had on the advancement of our nation, and we pledge to respect the trust and treaty responsibilities, strengthen tribal sovereignty and advance the tribal community. self-determination, ”Biden said.

There are 574 federally recognized tribes in the United States, according to the Office of Indian Affairs, and each tribe has its own culture and traditions.

In November, some tribes often take the opportunity to share more about themselves by hosting events or educational sessions throughout the month, but due to COVID-19, many of them have returned online or are subject to their local COVID-19 restrictions.

Arizona’s Gila River Governor Stephen Roe Lewis praised Biden’s proclamation for November.

“Native American Heritage Month is a testament to the resilience and strength of the Gila River Indian community, the tribes of Arizona State and Indian Country,” said Lewis. “I appreciate President Biden’s proclamation designating November as Native American Month and recognizing that not only this month but every month, we must honor the cultures and enduring contributions of all Native Americans.”

“There is no aspect of American history that has not been touched by our tribal communities, which predate the founding of state and nation by several centuries. From military service and agriculture to water and land conservation, our tribes have always played an extremely important role in shaping the world around us, ”added Lewis. “Our heritage is testament to our defining ability to meet any challenge, transcend even the most difficult of circumstances, and contribute to the fabric of this country.”

On the Navajo Nation, Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer shared their recognition of National Native American Heritage Month on their social media platforms on Monday.

November is a month “to honor the hope, future and resilience of Indigenous peoples, including the Navajo people, and to celebrate Indigenous cultures, languages ​​and indigenousness,” their article read.

“The month is a time to cherish and celebrate our rich and diverse cultures, traditions, languages ​​and heritages,” Nez said. “Our cultures and traditions are very much alive every day and with continued strength and resilience our children and grandchildren will carry our teachings into the future. “

Nationally, Home Secretary Deb Haaland – the first Native American to hold a ministerial post – kicked off the month in a video address on her Twitter page highlighting some of the work the U.S. Department of the Interior is continuing. to do for Native Americans in Alaska. Indigenous, Native Hawaiian, and Island communities. Haaland is New Mexico’s Laguna Pueblo.

“This month, we honor the gifts of our ancestors by celebrating Indigenous knowledge, traditions, language and culture. But at Interior, we do it every day, ”said Haaland.

“We are focusing our work on the voices of Indigenous peoples as we address the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous peoples and take action to help people heal from the painful practices of forced assimilation of residential schools,” she said. added.

“Native American history is American history and it is only by recognizing this history that we can build an equitable and inclusive future. Happy Native American Heritage Month everyone, ”said Haaland.

Google helped honor Indigenous Peoples for Native American Heritage Month with a Google Doodle featuring the late artist Zuni Pueblo We: wa.

The doodle was illustrated by artist Zuni Pueblo Mallery Quetawki, and it is a tribute to the late We: wa, who was a Zuni Pueblo fiber artist, weaver, and potter.

“The late We: wa was a cultural leader and revered mediator among the Zuni tribe, dedicating his life to the preservation of Zuni traditions and history,” Google said.

“Our nations, our stories”

How did Native American Heritage Month start? The first proclamation of Native American Heritage Month came in 1990 from President George HW Bush, after Congress passed a resolution that designated November 1990 as National Native American Heritage Month.

In 1991, Congress passed another resolution stating that each November will be proclaimed “American Indian Heritage Month,” and since then every sitting president has signed a proclamation.

The proclamations didn’t stop there: 18 years later, Congress passed the Native American Heritage Day Act of 2009, which designates the Friday following Thanksgiving Day each year as Native American Heritage Day.

These proclamations shine the national spotlight on Indigenous communities across the United States, and many large Indigenous organizations are joining together to raise awareness and celebrate November.

For example, the National Congress of American Indians launched its Native American Heritage Month campaign on Monday in announcing their theme on Twitter: “Our nations, our histories: reconquest through education.

“The unique stories and stories of tribal governments are what connect our communities and peoples – but more often than not they are told for us, rooted in misconceptions and half-truths,” NCAI tweeted.

“Through public education, we can recover the narrative and promote a common understanding of the rightful place of tribal nations in the family of American governments,” they added.

November celebrations are popping up across the country and varying from community to community, but one of the biggest national celebrations is the Rock Your Mocs social media event.

Rock Your Mocs is a social media event that features indigenous people wearing their traditional moccasins and encourages people to wear their moccasins, take a photo or video and share their stories using the event hashtags.

“We, as Indigenous peoples, are united by our tribal individuality, symbolically wear our moccasins, honor our ancestors and Indigenous peoples around the world, during Rock Your Mocs and National Native American Heritage Month,” the organizers said on Facebook.

The Rock Your Mocs Facebook page announced that its year, the event begins on November 14 and will end on November 20.

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