Community congress – Citrus Congress 2012 http://citruscongress2012.org/ Mon, 23 May 2022 12:39:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://citruscongress2012.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Community congress – Citrus Congress 2012 http://citruscongress2012.org/ 32 32 Fajans-Turner ends his run for Congress in the 22nd arrondissement https://citruscongress2012.org/fajans-turner-ends-his-run-for-congress-in-the-22nd-arrondissement/ Mon, 23 May 2022 12:13:40 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/fajans-turner-ends-his-run-for-congress-in-the-22nd-arrondissement/ Vanessa Fajans-Turner, who was previously a candidate in New York’s 22nd congressional district, announced on Sunday that she would not continue her campaign for Congress. Fajans-Turner’s announcement comes after finalized district maps were approved by a state judge on Saturday, May 21. The Legislature’s version of the Congressional map originally placed Ithaca in the 22nd […]]]>

Vanessa Fajans-Turner, who was previously a candidate in New York’s 22nd congressional district, announced on Sunday that she would not continue her campaign for Congress.

Fajans-Turner’s announcement comes after finalized district maps were approved by a state judge on Saturday, May 21.

The Legislature’s version of the Congressional map originally placed Ithaca in the 22nd Congressional District. However, the finalized map drawn by Special Master Jonathan Cervas places all of Tompkins and Ithaca County in the sprawling new 19th District, which ends at the Massachusetts border.

Related: Republican Steve Wells enters race in New York’s redesigned 22nd congressional district

This Moment ‘Bigger Than Any Individual Contestant,’ Says Fajans-Tuner

“Now that New York’s redistricting process is complete and its new district lines are final, I have made the difficult decision not to pursue my campaign for Congress,” Fajans-Turner said, according to a statement from hurry. “Tompkins County and my hometown of Ithaca have been drawn into New York’s 19th Congressional District, which spans 11 counties stretching from Tompkins to the Catskills and east through the River Valley. ‘Hudson to the Massachusetts border.This new district is very different from the one in which I have campaigned and won the trust of voters since its launch in February.

In his statement, Fajans-Turner affirmed his commitment to supporting fellow Democrats in November while acknowledging the challenges ahead for the party.

“We will need all the resources we have to secure a Democratic victory in November to fight Republican attacks on our democracy, our basic rights and our climate. I will not act in any way that divides the Democratic field in this new swing district with an established, well-funded Republican in contention. This national moment is bigger than any individual candidate, and it behooves us all to work for the greater common cause as the stakes in this race continue to rise,” Fajans-Turner said.

Republican Claudia Tenney, incumbent of the 22nd District, announced on Saturday that she would campaign in the new 24th District. Mike Sigler, Brian Williams and Steve Wells are the current Republicans in the race for the 22nd District.

“As I wrap up my campaign for Congress, my commitment to communities in this region has not changed. The imperative to act on issues such as climate change, reproductive freedom and the right to vote transcends our district and state borders, and the window for meaningful action is shrinking,” Fajans-Turner said. “To say I am grateful to everyone who believed in this campaign and its vision is the greatest understatement. I can imagine. We campaigned to stimulate conversation and engagement around key community issues. While our time in this race is over, our work certainly has not been.

You can read Fajans-Turner’s full statement here.

Related: INSIDE THE FLX: Vanessa Fajans-Turner for Congress (podcast)


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Six things to know about New York’s new Congressional map https://citruscongress2012.org/six-things-to-know-about-new-yorks-new-congressional-map/ Sat, 21 May 2022 17:07:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/six-things-to-know-about-new-yorks-new-congressional-map/ Jerry Nadler and Carolyn Maloney, in happier times. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images The chaos that has rocked this year’s congressional races in New York entered a new phase on Friday night, when a court-appointed special master – a postdoctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon named Jonathan Cervas – released new court-approved district lineselectronically filed in the […]]]>

Jerry Nadler and Carolyn Maloney, in happier times.
Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The chaos that has rocked this year’s congressional races in New York entered a new phase on Friday night, when a court-appointed special master – a postdoctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon named Jonathan Cervas – released new court-approved district lineselectronically filed in the middle of the night, who have literally redrawn the map of power in New York. Below are six things to know about how we got here, what it means, and what comes next.

“It seems to have been manipulated to ensure that black people are not represented. It’s an outrage,” Senator Kirsten Gillibrand told me this week in response to a draft of new congressional maps that cut Bedford-Stuyvesant in half and dropped Brooklyn’s two black congressmen, Hakeem Jeffries and Yvette Clarke, in the same district.

Chopping Bed-Stuy would have been a particularly bitter pill to swallow: For decades, the large black community had been divided into multiple congressional districts, allowing white members of Congress to win year after year. It took a trial in 1966, Cooper v. Ableto create a united neighborhood that soon led to Shirley Chisholm becoming the first black woman elected to Congress in 1968.

Jeffries – a lawyer widely considered to be Speaker of the House in the near future – had tweeted that the proposed initial maps “take a sledgehammer in black communities. It’s enough to make Jim Crow blush. He also openly floated the idea of ​​a lawsuit to challenge the cards as a violation of the Voting Rights Act, which prohibits diluting the power of communities of interest along racial lines.

Cervas got the message. “In the Congressional draft map, I inadvertently divided the community of Bedford-Stuyvesant,” he wrote as part of a long response to complaints about his first round of district lines. “I have placed this community in its entirety in District 8. Bedford-Stuyvesant is now the heart of District 8as it has always been.

Other minority communities have largely remained intact. The sprawling Seventh district, long represented by Nydia Velázquez—the first Puerto Rican woman elected to Congress—currently connects Latin American communities on the Lower East Side, Sunset Park, and Bushwick. the new seventh district throws out the Manhattan portion of the district and has slightly less Latino voting power (35%, down from 37%), but will likely be where Velázquez seeks re-election.

While this may not lead to civil rights litigation, Jewish leaders have complained to Cervas that redrawing the district long represented by Rep. Jerry Nadler — which spans the west side of Manhattan and winds across the harbor to include Borough Park — would eliminate America’s only predominantly Jewish neighborhood.

“The Boro Park Jewish community should be connected to communities that share their interests so that they are less politically isolated and their political voices are more likely to be heard,” leaders of the Jewish Community Relations Council said in a statement. communicated. letter in state court. The same letter implored Cervas not to put the east and west sides of Manhattan in the same neighborhood.

“Jews on the East Side can be clearly differentiated from Jews on the West,” JCRC President Cheryl Fishbein and CEO Gideon Taylor wrote. “It is rare for Jews on the East Side to belong to synagogues located on the West Side, or vice versa. To a large extent, West Side Jewish parents rarely send their children to East Side Jewish schools or vice versa.

Cervas did not address the problem directly, but rather minimize the East-West divide in Manhattan: “Even the areas bordering opposite sides of Central Park do not appear to be as starkly differentiated in terms of economic and demographic differences as they once were. So, while a tough choice, I find no compelling community of interest argument for altering the configuration of Manhattan’s congressional districts in the proposed map.

By consolidating the east and west sides of Manhattan into a single district, the new cards pit Nadler against longtime incumbent Carolyn Maloney; both said they or they intention attend primary school. It’s arguably a losing proposition for New York: Nadler chairs the powerful House Judiciary Committee, while Maloney heads the Oversight and Reform Committee.

“I served the Court as a nonpartisan expert,” Cervas wrote in his explanation. “These maps were blind drawn from the homes of the incumbents, using the criteria of good government set forth in the New York State Constitution.”

Nadler and Maloney have each spent decades accumulating the seniority and experience necessary to win their presidencies. If the two face off in a winner-takes-all primary, much of that authority will disappear.

The newly drawn Tenth Congressional District looks like a progressive politician’s dream: the Manhattan side includes Chelsea, Greenwich Village, and the Lower East Side, and the Brooklyn side includes Dumbo, Boerum Hill, Windsor Terrace, and all of Park Slope. A long list of pols is permanently or tentatively floating around, including State Senator Brad Hoylman and Assemblymen Jo Anne Simon and Yuh-Line Niou (who announcement she entered the race on Saturday afternoon).

Former mayor Bill de Blasio, who announced his candidacy on MSNBCshould be considered the frontrunner: voters across much of the district elected him for a generation, from community school board and city council (twice) to public advocate and mayor (twice). As de Blasio’s overall popularity waned towards the end of his term as mayor, his Park Slope base might be willing to fight for him once more.

But a new twist came in the race for the tenth arrondissement shortly after midnight, when the representative Mondary Jones – a freshman whose Lower Hudson Valley District includes all of Rockland County and part of North Westchester – unexpectedly announced that he will also be competing in the new district. (Congressional candidates do not have to live in a district to run.)

“This is the birthplace of the LGBTQ+ rights movement. Long before the Stonewall Uprising, queer people of color sought refuge within its borders,” tweeted Jones, who made history (along with Ritchie Torres) as the first openly gay black member of Congress.

Jones’ decision to leave the suburbs to run in the city eliminates the possibility of a showdown in Rockland County against Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, who also serves as head of the Democratic Congressional National Campaign Committee and was dragged into in the same district as Jones.

“From my point of view, I’m running right where I landed” says Sean Maloneywhich this week drew criticism from black and Latino leaders (including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez), who insisted that he step down as leader of the overall Democratic congressional campaign effort while challenging another incumbent.

A decade ago, an agreement brokered by then-Governor Andrew Cuomo and leaders of the state Assembly and Senate pushed through an amendment to the state Constitution that specified that the Redistricting the maps would be the responsibility of a ten-member Independent Redistricting Commission split equally between Republicans and Democrats. But this year, the panel is deadlocked, unable to agree on a single set of cards, and the legislature has moved forward with its own cards — which violated the Constitution.

“What we said at the time was that this is designed to fail,” said Deputy Senate Majority Leader Michael Gianaris. said. “Of course, what we predicted came true. They were deadlocked five to five. They were unable to function. It didn’t matter what lines we drew. The court said we had no authority to enact guidelines of any kind.

So some of the blame for today’s chaos belongs to former Speaker of the Assembly Sheldon Silverwho was later convicted of fraud, extortion and money laundering (and recently dead in jail); former Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos, who also traveled to federal prison in an unrelated corruption scandal; and former Governor Cuomo, who resigned last year amid allegations of misconduct.

New Yorker, after determining which district they are in now, must be prepared to vote twice this summer, as there will be two rounds of primaries. On June 28, New York will hold primaries for statewide positions (governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, comptroller, and U.S. Senate), as well as races for many local offices, including the state assembly, the civil court and the district chief.

The primary contests for Congress and the state Senate are scheduled for August 23. The August date — right in the middle of when many New Yorkers will be on vacation — wasn’t chosen at random. Federal law requires that the primaries be held early enough to allow for the printing and distribution of foreign and military ballots before the November 1 general election.

Like everything else in politics this year, it’s more unnecessarily complicated than it needs to be.

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Congress plans to provide more local support to fight poverty / Public Information Service https://citruscongress2012.org/congress-plans-to-provide-more-local-support-to-fight-poverty-public-information-service/ Fri, 20 May 2022 03:02:42 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/congress-plans-to-provide-more-local-support-to-fight-poverty-public-information-service/ May is Community Action Monthand local agencies helping low-income families hope Congress approves a plan to strengthen and modernize their federal support. Community action agencies help provide services such as job training and energy assistance. The House recently approved a new ten-year authorization of the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG). Among the changes is a […]]]>

May is Community Action Monthand local agencies helping low-income families hope Congress approves a plan to strengthen and modernize their federal support.

Community action agencies help provide services such as job training and energy assistance. The House recently approved a new ten-year authorization of the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG). Among the changes is a proposal to permanently increase income eligibility for people served by local programs.

Annie Shapiro, advocacy director for the Minnesota Community Action Partnership, said it was especially timely for families struggling with inflation and making just enough money to lose aid.

“Maybe they add an extra shift to work and start earning more,” Shapiro explained. “But in reality, either their actual purchasing power hasn’t changed because they’ve lost a lot of those benefits, or it’s still lower than it was before.”

The reauthorization would also increase annual funding to $1 billion. Shapiro stressed that this would give agencies more flexibility to tackle areas such as housing assistance, given skyrocketing rental costs. While the plan enjoys bipartisan support, some House Republicans have questioned the idea of ​​expanding the scope of the program without knowing its effectiveness on a broader level.

Shapiro countered that it is impractical to give individual agencies an overall rating, as each responds differently to needs in its service area.

“For examples from Minnesota, some of our agencies are using their CSBG funds to help fund their food shelves,” Shapiro noted. “Food departments receive some funding, but are often not funded from other sources.”

Emily Bombich, director of planning for the Arrowhead Economic Opportunity Agency, said part of their funding has gone towards providing shoes and boots to community members in need. She argued that an overwhelming response for the articles leads them to believe they could help others with additional congressional support.

“If we could give them this gift without them having to buy shoes for their kids, then maybe they could stretch their money further,” Bombich suggested.

Supporters said the grant program hasn’t seen a reauthorization like this in nearly two decades and hope bipartisan support continues in the Senate.

Disclosure: The Minnesota Community Action Association Resource Fund contributes to our fund for reporting on early childhood education, health issues, housing/homelessness, and poverty issues. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

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Booker, Tester, Merkley and Warren introduce bill to impose moratorium on major agribusiness mergers https://citruscongress2012.org/booker-tester-merkley-and-warren-introduce-bill-to-impose-moratorium-on-major-agribusiness-mergers/ Wed, 18 May 2022 16:05:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/booker-tester-merkley-and-warren-introduce-bill-to-impose-moratorium-on-major-agribusiness-mergers/ Booker, Tester, Merkley and Warren introduce bill to impose moratorium on major agribusiness mergers Washington D.C.- Today, U.S. Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ), Jon Tester (D-MT), Jeff Merkley (D-OR), and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) introduced the Food and Agribusiness Merger Moratorium and Antitrust Review Act of 2022, legislation that would impose an immediate and indefinite moratorium on […]]]>

Booker, Tester, Merkley and Warren introduce bill to impose moratorium on major agribusiness mergers

Washington D.C.- Today, U.S. Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ), Jon Tester (D-MT), Jeff Merkley (D-OR), and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) introduced the Food and Agribusiness Merger Moratorium and Antitrust Review Act of 2022, legislation that would impose an immediate and indefinite moratorium on acquisitions and mergers in the food and agriculture sector. Supported by agricultural, food, rural, community, labor, consumer and other advocacy organizations, the bill would also create a commission to study and publish recommended improvements to merger enforcement and antitrust surveillance in the agricultural and food sectors. The moratorium would be lifted once Congress acts on the commission’s recommendations by passing comprehensive legislation to address the problem of growing market concentration in agriculture. Complementary legislation was introduced in the House of Representatives by Rep. Mark Pocan (D-WI-02).

The concentration of the food and agricultural economy has accelerated at a rapid pace since the 1980s, and particularly since the Great Recession. This trend has far-reaching implications, especially for consumers. The infant formula industry, for example, has reached an alarming level of corporate concentration, with four companies now controlling almost 90% of the infant formula market. An interruption in the supply of a single producer of infant formula now poses a serious risk to infant health in the United States. Consolidation also contributes to the widening economic opportunity gap in the United States, as dominant companies are likely to generate profits for investors rather than raise wages or benefits.

Over the past four decades, the top four beef packers have increased their market share from 32% to 85%. This increased concentration, combined with the anti-competitive practices and other abuses of these large multinational meatpacking companies, is pushing small family farmers out of business and undermining the economy of rural communities.

“Increased market concentration in the food and agriculture industry has had dire consequences for family farmers and pastoralists, food workers, food quality and safety, and communities,” said Senator Booker. “Over the past four decades, we have seen the four largest corporations in almost every sector of the food and agricultural economy gain outsized market power. Using this power as leverage, these corporations have exerted undue influence on federal agricultural policies, pushed family farmers and ranchers out of business, and raised food prices to boost their profits while consumers pay more at the checkout.

“This alarming trend must be reversed,” continued Senator Booker. “I am proud to introduce this essential legislation that would put an urgent and indefinite pause on agribusiness mergers while a newly created commission provides recommendations to Congress on strengthening our antitrust laws. This is only once that Congress will act to address the damage caused by growing corporate concentration that the moratorium will be lifted This gives us the time we need to update existing laws that will better protect American farmers and ranchers, workers and communities that are harmed by corporate consolidation.

“The people of Montana know that consolidating our food systems is hurting rural America,” said Senator Tester. “Whether it’s meat packing or infant formula, a lack of market competition means tighter margins for American producers, higher costs for consumers, and makes our country less safe when these multinationals fail. Capitalism works exceptionally well when there is competition, and this bill will help put family farmers back in the driver’s seat by making our markets more competitive at every level.

“When agribusiness conglomerates control the market, family farms suffer, making it difficult to get fair prices and pushing them out of the market,” said Senator Merkley. “It serves no one and is devastating to our farming communities. I look forward to working with my colleagues to move this bill forward.

“The agriculture and food industries are highly concentrated, with only a few dominant players controlling the majority of the market,” said Senator Warren. “It’s time to stop mergers that hurt workers and allow corporate prices to rise that lead to higher costs for American families – this bill would help us do just that.”

“Corporate profits and the runaway consolidation of large agricultural corporations have driven prices up at every point in the food chain, from farm to grocery store,” Representative Pocan said. “Congress must do more to help local farmers compete while providing greater market transparency to the American consumer. Today, too many middle-class families, farmers and food workers are struggling to make ends meet. Establishing a moratorium on agribusiness mergers will protect our farms and farmers while ensuring consumers continue to enjoy variety on supermarket shelves.

“The concentration of the food system has allowed corporations to steal profits from farmers, drive up prices from consumers and force workers to live in unsafe and underpaid conditions,” said Sarah Carden, political advocate for the Farm Action Fund. “These abusive practices have become all too common, threatening both our food and national security. This legislation puts an immediate end to further consolidation, allowing us to build a fairer and more resilient food and agriculture system. »

“Corporate control of our food system is crushing American families with ever-rising grocery prices, while putting sustainable family farms on the brink of extinction. Only a handful of profiteering corporations wield enormous control over everything from international supply chains to the very seeds that farmers plant,” mentioned Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch. “Building a healthy and affordable food system means standing up for family farms and rural communities. The adoption of this legislation is a crucial first step in this process.

“The continued concentration of our agricultural and food markets allows dominant agribusinesses to exploit farmers and ranchers on one side of the supply chain and consumers on the other,” said Bill Bullard, CEO of R-CALF USA. “We commend Senators Booker and Tester for reintroducing this bill that protects food producers and food consumers from further harm and establishes a mechanism to begin to reverse that harm.”

Senator Booker has called for a moratorium on large agribusiness mergers since the legislation was first introduced in 2018.

Full text of the Food and Agribusiness Merger Moratorium and Antitrust Review Act can be found here.

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‘We must stand up’: Democrats slammed for inaction on abortion | Democrats https://citruscongress2012.org/we-must-stand-up-democrats-slammed-for-inaction-on-abortion-democrats/ Tue, 17 May 2022 08:05:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/we-must-stand-up-democrats-slammed-for-inaction-on-abortion-democrats/ SShortly after the Supreme Court’s draft opinion quashing Roe v. Wade was released to the public, California Governor Gavin Newsom condemned conservative attacks on abortion rights and promised his state would be a “sanctuary” for those seeking to terminate a pregnancy. But Newsom also directed some of his more pointed remarks at fellow Democrats. “Where […]]]>

SShortly after the Supreme Court’s draft opinion quashing Roe v. Wade was released to the public, California Governor Gavin Newsom condemned conservative attacks on abortion rights and promised his state would be a “sanctuary” for those seeking to terminate a pregnancy.

But Newsom also directed some of his more pointed remarks at fellow Democrats.

“Where the hell is my party? Where is the Democratic Party? Newsom said. “This is a concerted and coordinated effort, and yes, they are winning. They are. They were. Let’s recognize that. We have to wake up. Where is the counter-offensive?

Even as Democrats denounced the court’s interim decision to overturn Roe and pledged to defend abortion rights, their efforts at the federal level have largely failed to live up to their rhetoric. A vote last Wednesday in the Senate to codify Roe and protect abortion rights nationwide was again stalled, as Democrat Joe Manchin joined 50 Republican senators in opposing the bill.

The failure of Democrats in Washington to defend abortion rights, even as they control the White House and both houses of Congress, has complicated the party’s message to voters about Roe’s likely demise. Some frustrated Democrats are instead turning their attention to state and local policies that could protect reproductive rights even if Roe falls.

Abortion-rights supporters’ frustration with Democrats’ inaction at the federal level has been on display since the draft advisory was leaked earlier this month. At a protest outside the Supreme Court last week, abortion-rights protesters chanted, “Do something, Democrats.”

People rally for abortion rights in Washington DC on May 10. Photography: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Progressive members of Congress have also advocated for the urgent need to pass federal abortion rights legislation, calling on senators to amend the filibuster to pass a bill.

“People elected Democrats precisely so we could lead in perilous times like these – to codify Roe, hold corruption accountable, [and] having a president who uses his legal authority to break the deadlock in Congress on issues ranging from student debt to climate,” progressive Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez posted on Twitter.

The stakes for Democratic inaction are high, as abortion is certain or likely to be banned in 26 states if the court follows through on Roe’s overturn. Last weekend, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell warned that Republicans could go even further if they regain control of the White House and Congress, floating the idea of ​​a nationwide abortion ban.

Republicans would likely face widespread public outcry if they proposed a nationwide ban. A %09https:/www.monmouth.edu/polling-institute/reports/monmouthpoll_US_051122/”> poll released by Monmouth University last week found that only 9% of Americans support the idea of ​​a nationwide ban, while 64% support keeping abortion legal However, abortion rights advocates warn that the threat of a nationwide ban will be real if Republicans regain Congress and the White House.

“Republicans definitely pass a national abortion ban once they have the power to do so,” said Shaunna Thomas, co-founder and executive director of reproductive rights group UltraViolet. “They signaled that they were going to pack the Supreme Court in order to overthrow Roe. I don’t think people took them seriously enough. And so people really need to learn the lesson here and take them very, very seriously on this point.

Progressive groups like UltraViolet have called on Democrats to change the Senate filibuster, which would allow a bill codifying Roe to pass through the upper house with a simple majority of support. But Manchin and fellow Democrat Kyrsten Sinema have made it clear they won’t support a filibuster exclusion, and last Wednesday’s vote failed to even draw the 50 votes that would be needed if Senate rules were modified.

“Our constitutional right to abortion must be more important than their loyalty to arcane Senate procedures that aren’t even law,” Thomas said. “People watched them take down the filibuster to raise the debt ceiling. If they can do it for this, they should be able to do it for this.

Democratic congressional leaders have encouraged members of their party to direct their criticism at Republicans rather than at each other. In a “Dear Colleague” letter to House Democrats last week, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned of Republicans’ desire to ban abortion nationwide and said their policies could even “criminalize contraceptive care, in vitro fertilization and post-miscarriage care”. .

“Make no mistake: once Republicans give up precedent and privacy by unseating Roe, they will be aiming for additional basic human rights,” Pelosi said.

Nancy Pelosi speaks at an event on protecting abortion rights on Capitol Hill on May 13.
Nancy Pelosi speaks at an event on protecting abortion rights on Capitol Hill on May 13. Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPA

Christina Reynolds, vice president of communications at Emily’s List, which promotes pro-choice women candidates in the election, insisted that voters who support abortion rights will hold Republicans accountable in the midterm elections. in November. “Republicans got us here in a lot of ways,” Reynolds said.

But Democratic candidates running for office this fall will need to paint a longer-term picture of how the party plans to protect abortion rights, even if they can’t stop the court from overturning Roe.

“The Democratic Party needs to get away from this message about how we can fix everything right away,” said Kelly Dietrich, CEO of the National Democratic Training Committee. “This is the fight of a lifetime. The government is tough. We will need you to vote in November, next November and every November after that because the people who want to take away your rights are not going to stop.

In the meantime, Democrats have an opportunity to turn their attention to state and local offices that might be able to help protect abortion rights if Roe falls, Dietrich argued.

“The struggle for the next 10+ years will be at national and local levels,” he said. “It’s going to be in the state legislatures. It will be in city councils and in all the different local government forums that we have across the country that aren’t big and sexy.

Some of these efforts are already underway across the country.

In Michigan, where a 1931 abortion ban is still in effect and could come back into effect if Roe is overturned, Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer has filed a lawsuit to block enforcement. Several county prosecutors also signed a statement saying they would not pursue criminal charges related to the 1931 law.

One of those prosecutors was Democrat Karen McDonald of Oakland County, Michigan’s second-largest county. She said that despite her despair over Roe’s likely end, she was committed to finding ways to secure the rights and access to health care for her neighbors.

“It’s a sad and tragic moment,” McDonald said. “But I’m not going to spend a minute of my energy letting this take me away from what I think is absolutely essential right now, which is that we all need to be careful, support, fund and help. elect [those candidates] who want to protect our right to choose.

Oakland County was once a republican stronghold, but it has become increasingly democratic in recent years. McDonald said she heard from members of her community who previously supported Republicans and are now rethinking their policies in light of the Supreme Court’s expected ruling.

“I know a lot of women who voted for Trump who are now saying I will never, ever vote for a pro-life candidate. They just didn’t think it would happen,” McDonald said. “So I think that really upsets politics.”

Thomas agreed that many Americans who support abortion rights appear to have been surprised by the tentative decision to overrule Roe, even after Republicans won a 6-3 majority in court. Conservatives have also been calling for an end to Roe for decades, and Trump has promised to appoint anti-abortion justices to the Supreme Court.

“I don’t think it’s surprising that people have had to see it to believe it, although they have heard it, especially from black and brown women who have long borne the brunt of these attacks on the level of the state,” Thomas said. . “As an organizer, I tell you, it’s never too late to fight. And now is the time.

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1 dead and 4 seriously injured in California church shooting https://citruscongress2012.org/1-dead-and-4-seriously-injured-in-california-church-shooting/ Sun, 15 May 2022 23:37:33 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/1-dead-and-4-seriously-injured-in-california-church-shooting/ One person was killed and four others seriously injured after a gunman opened fire at a Southern California church on Sunday, authorities said. The shooter was arrested outside the Presbyterian Church of Geneva in Laguna Woods, Calif., said Carrie Braun, spokeswoman for the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. The motive for the shooting was not immediately […]]]>

One person was killed and four others seriously injured after a gunman opened fire at a Southern California church on Sunday, authorities said.

The shooter was arrested outside the Presbyterian Church of Geneva in Laguna Woods, Calif., said Carrie Braun, spokeswoman for the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. The motive for the shooting was not immediately clear, she said.

Four of the victims were in critical condition, she said, and another victim was being treated for minor injuries. The person who was killed was found inside the church by authorities, she said. Ms Braun did not share any additional details about the victims.

“My understanding is that this all happened inside the church building,” Ms Braun said. “We’re trying to figure out what kind of service was going on at the time.”

The Department mentioned that officials had recovered a weapon that may have been involved in the shooting, which was reported at 1:26 p.m. local time. The city of Laguna Woods, incorporated in 1999, is about 80 km southeast of Los Angeles.

Orange County Sheriff’s Department officials said during a press conference that there were a large number of Taiwanese worshipers inside the church, but did not say whether they were the targets of the attack.

Cynthia Conners, the acting mayor of Laguna Woods, said Sunday that she was a member of the church and attended services that morning. She said a Taiwanese congregation shares church space and “is more likely to be on that campus later in the day.”

Ms Conners said she left the church around noon and Taiwanese members usually left a little later in the afternoon.

Charlotte Hsieh, the church organist, said she left the church around noon after services had ended. “We have our fingers crossed for the safety of the congregation,” she said.

Ms Hsieh said the church is in a quiet retirement community in a safe neighborhood.

“I couldn’t even imagine something like this could happen here,” she said. “I’m as shocked as anyone.”

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said on Twitter that he was helping with the investigation.

The California governor’s office said the Twitter that “no one should be afraid to go to their place of worship”.

“Our thoughts are with the victims, the community and all those affected by this tragic event,” the office said.

Katie Porter, a Democratic congresswoman who represents Orange County, called the news disturbing, especially given the shooting in Buffalo, NY, on Saturday. “This shouldn’t be our new normal,” Ms Porter said.

Vimal Patel and Livia Albeck-Ripka contributed report.

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New Congress mantra on social engineering plans to reserve 50% of seats for weaker sections of the party https://citruscongress2012.org/new-congress-mantra-on-social-engineering-plans-to-reserve-50-of-seats-for-weaker-sections-of-the-party/ Sat, 14 May 2022 14:23:23 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/new-congress-mantra-on-social-engineering-plans-to-reserve-50-of-seats-for-weaker-sections-of-the-party/ Udaipur: In what is clearly an acknowledgment of the success that the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has achieved through its multi-level outreach program among the unrepresented and under-represented sections within the Other Backward Class (OBC) and Scheduled Castes (SC), the Congress decided on Saturday May 14 to reserve places for “sub-castes” within these groups in […]]]>

Udaipur: In what is clearly an acknowledgment of the success that the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has achieved through its multi-level outreach program among the unrepresented and under-represented sections within the Other Backward Class (OBC) and Scheduled Castes (SC), the Congress decided on Saturday May 14 to reserve places for “sub-castes” within these groups in all its party committees.

Of the six panels that Congress has established in Chintan Shivir, the Social Justice and Empowerment (SJ&E) Panel plans to recommend to the Congress Working Committee (CWC) that the reservation for SC/ST/OBC/minorities be increased to 50% in all its committees of its current provision to have 20% reservation for non-privileged groups.

“The policy has undergone significant changes. It is time for us to implement the new reserve to accommodate and represent diverse groups in our party at all levels,” said SJ&E Panel Leader Salman Khurshid.

Explaining how the reservation system will work, he said the panel proposed to set up a social justice advisory council to collect population-wide data across India and give 50% short-term reservation to these groups.

“The reservation system is proposed to be implemented from stand level. The task before us is first to identify unrepresented and underrepresented groups and then to represent them in party bodies,” said K.Raju, National Congress Coordinator for SC/ST/ OBC/Minorities.

Raju, who is also on the SJ&E panel, said that over the past two days, the panel has been discussing organizational reforms and policy initiatives that Congress can adopt as part of its policy agenda.

One of the most important organizational reforms that the party has decided to implement is to have a unified department for SC/ST/OBC/minorities instead of the four separate departments that currently exist.

In another important recommendation, the panel also decided to push for the reservation of women in parliament and state assemblies, and to have a “quota within a quota” to accommodate all castes and groups. religious among women.

As part of its political initiative, the panel also recommended the implementation of the Women’s Reservation Bill which guarantees 33% of positions for women in the legislature. At the same time, he recommended booking in the private sector.

Khurshid said that if the CWC accepts these recommendations, the party will also explore ways to implement these policies in states governed by Congress. “The legal and technical aspects will have to be settled. There may also be some opposition in states, but we are committed to implementing these policies,” Khurshid said.

He added that to have a successful model of “social engineering”, the party must go through a successful model of ensuring social justice within the party.

Moreover, the Congress has expressed its full support for a caste-based census among OBCs which has been blocked by the Modi government. “The UPA government had already done a socio-economic census among the OBCs. So we’ve always been open to the idea. Having a caste census will not be a problem for us,” Raju said. This will help the ruling parties to eventually formulate a policy of reserving OBCs in assemblies and parliament, he said, indicating that the main concern of the big-old party is to woo OBCs who have moved in large majority towards the BJP.

He also said that the SC/ST sub-plan introduced by Indira Gandhi, which provides a separate budget for these groups in all departments, should be enacted by central legislation. The SC/ST sub-plan or the special component plan is the most violated rule in all states, regardless of the parties in power.

He said special meetings to explore possibilities for greater representation and develop community outreach program among marginalized communities will be held at all levels, especially in Pradesh Congress Committees and Pradesh Congress Committees. district.

Kumari Shelja, also a member of the panel, said that all these recommendations were decided after discussions with all fronts of the party, such as its student wing, the National Union of Students of India (NSUI) and the Mahila Congress. .

She said many of those recommendations were achieved by being “self-critical”, as party leader Rahul Gandhi had hoped in Chintan Shivir.

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After terrorists kill Rahul Bhat at J&K, Congress accuses BJP of plotting to kill Kashmiri Hindus https://citruscongress2012.org/after-terrorists-kill-rahul-bhat-at-jk-congress-accuses-bjp-of-plotting-to-kill-kashmiri-hindus/ Fri, 13 May 2022 07:32:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/after-terrorists-kill-rahul-bhat-at-jk-congress-accuses-bjp-of-plotting-to-kill-kashmiri-hindus/ Kashmiri Pandit government employees and their families protest the murder of Rahul Bhat Photo: ANI New Delhi: Congress flayed the Bharatiya Janata Paty (BJP) on Friday for the brutal murder of Rahul Bhat, a Kashmiri pundit who was shot dead yesterday by terrorists in the Budgam district of Jammu and Kashmir. Congress Spokesperson Asit Nath […]]]>

Kashmiri Pandit government employees and their families protest the murder of Rahul Bhat

Photo: ANI

New Delhi: Congress flayed the Bharatiya Janata Paty (BJP) on Friday for the brutal murder of Rahul Bhat, a Kashmiri pundit who was shot dead yesterday by terrorists in the Budgam district of Jammu and Kashmir.
Congress Spokesperson Asit Nath Tiwari has accused the Saffron Party of plotting the murder of Kashmiri Hindus
Whenever the BJP came to power in the Center, it orchestrated attacks on the Kashmiri Pandits, claimed Tiwari and also blamed the Saffron Party for genocide and the KP exodus in the early 1990s.

“Kashmir pundit killing benefits BJP”

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Kashmir: Protest against Rahul Bhat’s murder turns violent; police use tear gas and stun grenades to control the situation

“From 2014 until today, several KPs have been killed in different parts of the valley. These killings benefit the BJP as it uses them to polarize the nation,” the Congress spokesperson said.

As many as 14 people from Jammu and Kashmir’s minority Hindu community, including Kashmiri Pandits, were killed by militants between August 2019 and March 2022.

Those targeted by the extremists included prominent businessmen, sarpanchs and bloc development board members in various parts of Kashmir.

After Bhat’s cremation, Kashmiri Pandit government employees and their families took to the streets to peacefully protest his assassination. However, to prevent them from getting off the march, the cops fired tear gas canisters and carried out lathicharges.

“Kashmir pundits are the sitting ducks of terrorists”

Members of the community, including Rahul Bhat’s family, have also accused the BJP-led government at the Center of ‘cannon fodder’ young Kashmiri Hindus in the name of community rehabilitation.

The incident shattered our dream of permanently relocating to the valley, they said.

“The BJP has formulated a plan to have young Kashmiri Pandits killed in the name of giving them jobs and rehabilitating them. These people are sitting ducks for terrorists who use them for target practice,” said Soon Nath Bhat, a relative of Rahul Bhat.

Kashmiri Pandit brutally murdered in Jammu and Kashmir Devastated family demands justice Times Now
Kashmiri Pandit brutally murdered in Jammu and Kashmir; A devastated family seeks justice | times now

Jammu and Kashmir BJP Chairman Ravinder Raina and other party leaders, who attended the funeral, faced anger from community members as they hurled slogans against the PM Narendra Modi, Lieutenant Governor of Jammu and Kashmir Manoj Sinha and the BJP.

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Bay Area Reporter :: Editorial: BAR Congressional Approvals https://citruscongress2012.org/bay-area-reporter-editorial-bar-congressional-approvals/ Wed, 11 May 2022 23:21:50 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/bay-area-reporter-editorial-bar-congressional-approvals/ We are fortunate in the Bay Area to have a strong Democratic congressional delegation. That trend appears to be continuing even as the 15th congressional district selects a new representative to succeed retiring Jackie Speier, who ably represented parts of San Mateo County and San Francisco during her nearly 15 years in office. able. This […]]]>

We are fortunate in the Bay Area to have a strong Democratic congressional delegation. That trend appears to be continuing even as the 15th congressional district selects a new representative to succeed retiring Jackie Speier, who ably represented parts of San Mateo County and San Francisco during her nearly 15 years in office. able. This primary election will also give voters the first chance to weigh in on California’s new junior senator, Alex Padilla, the former secretary of state who Governor Gavin Newsom appointed last year after Kamala Harris became vice president. .

Below are our recommendations for Congress in the June 7 primary.

US Senate: Alex Padilla
Alex Padilla is running for a full six-year term. He has been a strong ally to the LGBTQ community. In his Bay Area Reporter endorsement questionnaire, Padilla wrote that he is a strong supporter of the LGBTQ community. “I will continue to fight for a future in which all civil and human rights of LGBTQ+ people are recognized,” he said. “The assaults on the LGBTQ+ community that we see happening across the country underscore the urgency of passing legislation at the federal level that protects the rights of all LGBTQ+ Americans. I am committed to defending federal legislation, like the Equality Act, which guarantees equal protection for everyone.”

Padilla is a strong advocate for affordable housing and addressing the homelessness crisis gripping the state. He proposed a Housing for All Act that would invest billions of dollars in programs that have proven successful in addressing the shortage of affordable housing, including the National Housing Trust Fund and supportive housing for disabled people. “Many programs in the [Housing for All] bill were inspired by efforts that have been launched right here in California,” he wrote, “such as the creation of a secure parking program to create parking sites that provide spaces for those who live out of their vehicles to park overnight. spaces like hotels, motels and malls into housing for the homeless and vulnerable, he noted.

Padilla said he successfully pushed the Biden administration to extend the eviction moratorium last year, and said the government must reallocate federal rent relief funding to communities that had the most need.

Padilla isn’t widely known to Californians, which is why this election matters. One of his Democratic challengers is Santa Barbara tech billionaire Dan O’Dowd, who is running an ad campaign criticizing the safety of self-driving cars. Additionally, the California Democratic Party got it wrong when it accidentally excluded Padilla’s name from its list of approved candidates in the state’s voter guide; the party approved it in March, while the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Padilla became the first Latino from California to serve in the Senate (and he was the first Latino in state history to be elected to his former position as Secretary of State). Representation matters, as we regularly stress, and having your voice in the Senate is crucial for all Californians. We recommend a vote for Padilla in the June 7 primary ballot.

15th Congressional District:
Kevin Mullin

This race, as mentioned above, is the only one in which the incumbent is not seeking re-election. The district includes parts of San Mateo County and San Francisco. Current Assemblyman Kevin Mullin (D-San Mateo) gets our endorsement because of his passion and commitment to making our democracy work for everyone. During a Zoom editorial board meeting, Mullin was enlivened by the recent leak of the U.S. Supreme Court’s draft opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade, who granted the right to abortion for 50 years. “Roe’s news is an abomination,” he said. “It undermines the will of the people.” While careful to reiterate that this was a leaked draft notice — the final notice, expected in late June or early July, could be different — Mullin nonetheless insisted that, if elected to Congress, he would work to protect other court-granted rights, such as same-sex marriage, which could also be overturned. “A whole range of rights are under attack,” Mullin said.

He said there was a desperate need for a “strongly Democratic Senate” and for Democrats to retain control of the House of Representatives. The national outcry over Roe’s possible end could motivate Democratic and Liberal independents to run not just in the primaries, but in the midterm elections in November.

Mullin, the Assembly’s pro tem speaker, has been a strong ally in the Legislature and received a 100% score from Equality California from 2013-2020. He has also supported many LGBTQ-related bills drafted by members of the LGBTQ Legislative Caucus and he authored an Assembly resolution in 2015 condemning the “Sodomite Suppression Act” ballot measure, which a judge ruled unconstitutional so it would not face voters.

Mullin also discussed what he sees as his district’s biggest issue, the affordability crisis, which includes affordable housing, climate change and building an economy that works for everyone. Mullin is a progressive lawmaker who will ably fill Speier’s shoes — she endorsed him and he worked for her years ago — and will be a good addition to the Bay Area’s congressional delegation.

We recommend Mullin for the 15th Congressional District.

Other Congress Races
house tenant Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) is running for another term in the 11th congressional district. Pelosi, who led the House vote on the Equality Act in 2021, is a key ally of the LGBTQ community. That bill, introduced by gay congressman David Cicilline (D-Rhode Island) continues to languish in the Senate and will likely need to be reintroduced next year. Pelosi has done a stellar job leading an at times fractured Democratic caucus. She will almost certainly be re-elected.


Congresswoman Barbara Lee

Over in the East Bay, Congressman Barbara Lee (D-Oakland) is also up for reelection. A staunch ally, Lee, along with Pelosi, was instrumental in bringing the AIDS Memorial Quilt back to the Bay Area in 2019. Lee is a longtime supporter of the HIV/AIDS community as well as the LGBTQ community. We gladly support his re-election in the 12th congressional district.

Eric Swalwell (D-Dublin) is running for another term. He is a community ally and is best known for taking on Republicans, including former President Donald Trump. East Bay voters are expected to return him to office in the 14th congressional district.

In the South Bay, holder of the 17th congressional district Ro Khanna (D-San Jose) is a progressive ally who in 2020 introduced the Gender Neutral Passport Bill. (Last month, the US State Department officially changed its policy to now allow such passports.) He will continue to advocate for climate change policies and Medicare for All.

Another congressman from South Bay is Anna Eshoo (D-Palo Alto), which represents the 16th district. She worked to protect the integrity of elections and to expand access to the right to vote. She is a longtime ally.

Congressman Zoe Lofgren (D-San Jose) completes the South Bay delegation and represents the 18th district. She is a strong advocate for reproductive freedom and a steadfast ally.

In the East Bay, Congressman John Garamendi (D) is running in the new 8th District after his old seat was split. He doesn’t live in the district (members of Congress don’t have to), and although it’s a very diverse district, the incumbent’s power makes him likely to be elected. He has been a good ally to the LGBTQ community and has said he will reach out to the community he now represents. This is not the first time that Garamendi has been hit by redistricting.

In the new 9th Congressional District, incumbent Josh Harder struggled with homelessness while in the House. That seat was previously represented by retired Jerry McNerney and includes the East Bay towns of Tracy and Manteca in San Joaquin County.

In the 10th Ward of Contra Costa County, Marc Desaulnier is running for re-election. He has been a strong ally over the years.

In North Bay, we recommend re-election of Democratic incumbents Jared Huffman in the 2nd arrondissement and mike thompson in the 4th arrondissement. Both have served their constituents well over the years and are allies.

Help keep the Bay Area Reporter going during these difficult times. To support local, independent and LGBTQ journalism, consider become a member of the BAR.


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Mineta was the reparations hero for Asian Americans https://citruscongress2012.org/mineta-was-the-reparations-hero-for-asian-americans/ Tue, 10 May 2022 16:31:22 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/mineta-was-the-reparations-hero-for-asian-americans/ Norman Y. Mineta will forever be remembered as the man who achieved justice for those incarcerated by Japanese internment. He pushed through reparations in a Republican administration. Reparations, the holy grail of BIPOC. After Mineta did it under Reagan, it was never reproduced. In hindsight, it looks like a magic trick. But that was not […]]]>

Norman Y. Mineta will forever be remembered as the man who achieved justice for those incarcerated by Japanese internment.

He pushed through reparations in a Republican administration. Reparations, the holy grail of BIPOC.

After Mineta did it under Reagan, it was never reproduced. In hindsight, it looks like a magic trick. But that was not the case. It was just hard work and politics.

Emile Guillermo

That’s why we should all revere the man who died appropriately enough the first week of May, the month now known as Asian American Indian, Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. .

Mineta was one of the first congressional boosters to lengthen what was originally a week, then coined it Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month. His death on May 3rd is an important marker of the importance of diversity and representation at the highest levels of government, politics and elective office.

Mineta, who was 90, lived through every major moment in modern Asian American history. For the barriers he broke down and the policies he established, he was simply the father figure to the community. He was Mr. Asian America.

For a short time, I was able to be close to him. At the 103rd Congress in 1993, I was Mineta’s press secretary and speechwriter.

I was at NPR hosting “All Things Considered.” When I left that job, I thought that as a Californian in Washington, I should at least know how democracy works from the inside. Ideally, I thought you could cross the line into the underworld of politics once. You can even cross back where you came from. Once. But Norm was no ordinary politician.

He was the embodiment of Asian America in public life.

He was our hopes and our dreams. Our cries and our sorrows. From when he was an incarcerated Cub with other Japanese Americans during World War II, to when he served in government, Norm was there for all of us.

He was our fighter and our redeemer when he co-sponsored the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which brought justice to internees. More than $1.6 billion has been paid out to 82,200 Japanese Americans, according to The New York Times.

It was always the difference maker. Norm was in the fight to rectify the historic transgression that gives Asian Americans our moral authority to this day.

There were, of course, other Asian American politicians. But few had the career arc of Mineta, who first served locally in 1971 as mayor of San Jose. He was the first Asian American mayor of a major American city.

In 1974 he was first elected to Congress, resigning in 1995 when the divided government began to form with an aggressive GOP led by Newt Gingrich.

But Norm reappeared in government with more Asian American firsts, as Commerce Secretary in the Clinton Cabinet and then Transportation Secretary under GW Bush. Two administrations. Two different parties.

I was not working for him at the time. Neither did I later, when Norm continued to evolve as a Washington player, first at aerospace giant Lockheed Martin, then as vice president of public relations giant Hill+Knowlton.

The standard I knew was the 1993 standard. The popular standard.

The Norm who drove a modest white Dodge Colt, because he wanted an American car. I knew the guy who worked all day, then carried a huge bag of homework to read for the next day. I knew the guy who was in the Civil Liberties Act post-flux triumph, always diligent, persistent, and looking for a way to make things better.

This is what I learned the most about Norm. Remember, this was the early 90s. Washington was getting meaner, more divisive and blocked.

But Norm had friends like the late Republican Senator Alan Simpson. They met as Boy Scouts in Wyoming. One imprisoned, the other free. Later, as members of Congress, they championed a kind of bipartisanship that is rare these days. It was true with others across the aisle. Like the late Rep. Henry Hyde, author of the infamous Hyde Amendment, which denies federal funding for abortions in public programs like Medicaid and Medicare.

Norm was good friends with Hyde. Maybe that’s the political lesson I learned from Mineta. Legislation is one thing, but we are all human beings. And the goal is to turn opponents into friends and keep your friends friends. You keep the channels open. You create new alliances, like the idea of ​​public-private partnerships.

Sounds too Republican for your taste?

The thing is, Mineta was always looking for solutions, working with others to make things better.

It passes as the country is bitterly divided over everything. His life should serve as a playbook on how to preserve the integrity of the fragile nature of our democracy.

Remember Norm Mineta. He was the Democrat who pushed through the reparations in a Republican administration.

Today, that would make him a political Superman. I will remember him as Mr. Asian America.

Emil Guillermo is a journalist and commentator. He writes for the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund. You can follow him on Twitter @emilamok

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