Community congress – Citrus Congress 2012 http://citruscongress2012.org/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 04:46:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://citruscongress2012.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Community congress – Citrus Congress 2012 http://citruscongress2012.org/ 32 32 Mumbai News Live Updates: Delhi boy who ‘came to see Mumbai’: Body in morgue, police try to trace teenager’s family https://citruscongress2012.org/mumbai-news-live-updates-delhi-boy-who-came-to-see-mumbai-body-in-morgue-police-try-to-trace-teenagers-family/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 04:34:59 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/mumbai-news-live-updates-delhi-boy-who-came-to-see-mumbai-body-in-morgue-police-try-to-trace-teenagers-family/ Faced with criticism for Vedanta-Foxconn choosing Gujarat over Maharashtra, Chief Minister Eknath Shinde said that even if the semiconductor project went to the neighboring state, there will be huge “new investments in Maharashtra,” adding that he had discussions with Prime Minister Narendra. Modi and Union Home Minister Amit Shah. Mumbai Police have banned the transport […]]]>

Faced with criticism for Vedanta-Foxconn choosing Gujarat over Maharashtra, Chief Minister Eknath Shinde said that even if the semiconductor project went to the neighboring state, there will be huge “new investments in Maharashtra,” adding that he had discussions with Prime Minister Narendra. Modi and Union Home Minister Amit Shah.

Mumbai Police have banned the transport of cattle in the city to prevent the spread of lumpy skin disease. Police issued an order to that effect on September 14 and it will remain in effect until October 13, an official said on Sunday. Anyone caught violating the order will be punished, he said. The area under the Mumbai police station is declared a “controlled area” for lumpy skin diseases, the order said.

As many as 2,053 pro bono claims filed by relatives of deceased Covid-19 patients in the state are under scrutiny for duplication. The state disaster management department has sent notices to recipients, notifying the FIR if they do not repay the additional amount.

Separately, the Mumbai Police Traffic Division reversed a decision by former police commissioner Sanjay Pandey and resumed towing vehicles in the city. The decision to prohibit the towing of the vehicles was made by Pandey who is now in the custody of the Enforcement Branch. He often claimed that there was “huge” corruption in vehicle towing.

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A lesson from the past for Ron DeSantis https://citruscongress2012.org/a-lesson-from-the-past-for-ron-desantis/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/a-lesson-from-the-past-for-ron-desantis/ In this particular case, the Citizens’ Council had a specific target in mind: Edward M. Kennedy, the president’s younger brother, who was running for a seat in the United States Senate. “President Kennedy’s brother has given you a great reception in Massachusetts,” the council leadership assured them. “Good jobs, housing, etc. are promised.” Kennedy, a […]]]>

In this particular case, the Citizens’ Council had a specific target in mind: Edward M. Kennedy, the president’s younger brother, who was running for a seat in the United States Senate. “President Kennedy’s brother has given you a great reception in Massachusetts,” the council leadership assured them. “Good jobs, housing, etc. are promised.”

Kennedy, a summer resident of Hyannis, called the segregationists’ bluff: He hosted a reception for Harris, made up of local residents who gave him a warm welcome.

The story of the Reverse Freedom Rides took on new meaning this week when people apparently associated with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis have pledged a group of Venezuelan asylum seekers that good jobs and housing, as well as expedited work permits, awaited them in Boston. Instead, the migrants were unknowingly transported to Martha’s Vineyard in an effort to surprise and expose the hypocrisy of liberals who oppose the Republican Party’s hard line on immigration.

The scheme didn’t work exactly as expected. The people of the small island warmly welcomed the asylum seekers, just as the citizens of Hyannis had welcomed David Harris some 60 years earlier.

Both stories share similar characteristics. In both cases, elected officials tried to corner their critics. In neither case was the scheme immediately successful, although today’s story has yet to unfold.

In mid-1961, the Congress of Racial Equality organized a series of Freedom Rides in which interracial groups drove Greyhound buses through Southern states in an effort to test the effectiveness of the Supreme Court’s ban on segregated facilities serving interstate travel. The Freedom Riders experienced frequent and backlash from local residents and law enforcement officials, who deployed terrorism and unlawful arrests and imprisonments. The Freedom Rides, still in effect a year later, proved a costly embarrassment to elected officials and business leaders in the South, who watched the region’s violent lawlessness splash across newspapers around the world.

The Freedom Rides came at a time when violence from the South, in general, threatened to become a drag on the region’s economic prospects and posed a political problem for the administration in Washington, which was vying with the Soviet Union for loyalty. former colonial subjects in Asia and Africa, most of them non-white. When an angry mob held a group of black worshipers hostage inside First Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, columnist Murray Kempton captured popular opinion in the North and beyond when he remarked caustically: “They are proud, brave and faithful people and some of them even found time to worry about the wives of the stalwarts of the White Citizens’ Councils who might have to cook their own breakfasts on morning.

The white South had a public relations problem.

Enter George Singlemann, a member of the Greater New Orleans Citizens’ Council and aide to Leander Perez, the city’s leading segregationist — a man so extreme in his anti-black and anti-Semitic biases that the local Catholic bishop excommunicated him. Singlemann’s idea was simple: Northern white liberals, he argued, were hypocrites, and their hypocrisy needed to be exposed. Safe in their urban and suburban white enclaves, they could look down on Southern segregationists because they didn’t have to live, work, and go to school with African Americans.

By busing thousands of black people from the South to northern communities, the Citizens’ Council could bring the civil rights movement back to the North. Northern whites, he surmised, were no more interested in sharing their towns and suburbs with blacks than were southern whites. It was with this sentiment in mind that the Mississippi House of Representatives passed a non-binding resolution that proposed to “redistribute the dissatisfied black population to other areas where political leaders consistently demand equal rights for all persons without regard to the constitution, judicial precedent and rights”. States. »

Across the South, citizens’ councils as far away as Macon, Ga., and Selma, Ala., Shreveport, La., and Jackson, Miss., lied with impunity, assuring black residents that jobs and homes awaited them in their new home states. This has never been the case, especially on Cape Cod, where the off-season unemployment rate normally hovered around 20%. A man who was explicitly promised a job and a home in Cape Town by the Citizens’ Council told reporters he felt cheated. “I would like to get my hands on those two men who shot me for coming here,” he fumed.

In the end, the plan turned out to be half way too clever. White political and business leaders never fully committed to funding it and were divided on its effectiveness. In a decade when about 400 black Southerners migrated Daily heading north, voluntarily and on their own, in search of a more hospitable political and economic environment, the Reverse Freedom Rides eventually resettled about 200 people in one year.

Some northern white mayors complained that their communities were already suffering from high unemployment and a housing crisis, perhaps proving Singlemann’s point. But for the most part, Northerners pointed to the Reverse Freedom Rides as another example of the deplorable South. It was “a cheap traffic in human misery from the racists of the South”, the New York Time editorialized. The Ohio governor compared it to “Hitler and his Nazis forcing the Jews out of Germany.” Northern senators have denounced the White Citizens’ Councils as “cruel and callous” and displaying a “shameful lack of judgment.” When asked to intervene, President John F. Kennedy, normally restrained in his condemnation of the white South, replied that “it’s a pretty cheap exercise.”

Even many southern white civic leaders have joined in the chorus of criticism. The Richmond Times-Dispatch stated that “we will be open to the imputation that we are not concerned with human issues, but rather with propaganda”. In Little Rock, the Arkansas Gazette argued that the scheme had “never been condoned by the most thinking people here” and argued that “these people” – members of the black community – “are our responsibility, unless they choose to leave on their own initiative. In New Orleans, a popular radio show denounced the campaign as “sick sensationalism bordering on silly.”

Short-lived and ultimately a failure, the Reverse Freedom Rides did little to bolster the reputation of the South and, at least on the sidelines, probably caused him more harm.

The irony, of course, was that the White Citizens Council didn’t really need to do a cheap shot. The North already had a large black population, a population that had grown by leaps and bounds since the start of World War II. Certainly, in the North, black people could vote and build political power. But a complex thicket of discrimination in housing, jobs, credit, banking and policing – and in the provision of public services such as education and infrastructure – has made black people second-class citizens in the most northern locations. In the mid-1960s, urban unrest and protests over school desegregation and housing would expose these inequalities.

Singlemann was not wrong, per se, when he observed a certain comfortable hypocrisy on the part of northern liberals. He was just “dumb” in the way he tried to expose her.

As was the case 60 years ago, politicians last week used a group of vulnerable people to change the subject – to move the political debate to more comfortable ground.

Are many people who live far from the border hypocritical on the issue of immigration? Probably, in some ways. Large numbers of immigrants live in blue cities and states, many of whom are undocumented, and citizens who live in these places benefit from cheap labor and services. Whether in Massachusetts or Florida, undocumented residents face profound challenges and disadvantages, even as they are a vital part of the regional economy.

But that’s not quite the point. Nor was that the goal in 1962. The Reverse Freedom Rides were not a constructive attempt to solve a broad political and social problem. They were, as President Kennedy said, “rather cheap exercise.”

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Congressional Mobile Home Park Courtroom Stay: Tenants of Congressional Mobile Home Park Obtained Temporary Restraining Order Against Congress Corner LLC To Postpone Their Evictions – News https://citruscongress2012.org/congressional-mobile-home-park-courtroom-stay-tenants-of-congressional-mobile-home-park-obtained-temporary-restraining-order-against-congress-corner-llc-to-postpone-their-evictions-news/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 19:42:31 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/congressional-mobile-home-park-courtroom-stay-tenants-of-congressional-mobile-home-park-obtained-temporary-restraining-order-against-congress-corner-llc-to-postpone-their-evictions-news/ Congress Mobile Home Park, marred by empty lots, September 8 (Photo by Jana Birchum) The tenants at Congress Mobile Home Park won a temporary restraint order to postpone their evictions, a significant victory for residents of the South Austin property who have yet to secure new housing. The long-standing and tight-knit community was turned upside […]]]>

Congress Mobile Home Park, marred by empty lots, September 8 (Photo by Jana Birchum)

The tenants at Congress Mobile Home Park won a temporary restraint order to postpone their evictions, a significant victory for residents of the South Austin property who have yet to secure new housing.

The long-standing and tight-knit community was turned upside down earlier this year when new owner Reza Paydar and its entity Congress Corner LLC informed the tenants – some of whom had lived in the park for decades – that their leases were not being renewed; they had 60 days to move out. The tenants’ association lodged a complaint, Texas RioGrande Legal Aid and the Austin Community Law Center, alleging that state law requires Paydar to provide 180 days notice to tenants facing eviction — because it intends to change the use of the property by converting it from an affordable housing option to a more expensive RV facility serving travellers. A Travis County district judge granted the TRO on September 1, with an extension granted on September 12. A final ruling on the lawsuit itself will be made in the coming days, but granting a TRO normally signals that the judge thinks plaintiffs have a high chance of success.

The vast majority of residents who lived in Congress Mobile Home Park at the start of 2022 have already moved — some to their South Austin neighborhood, others entirely out of Travis County. But a handful of families remain in the park, struggling to meet the myriad challenges of the housing market and especially the mobile home side of that market. “The stakes are high,” Noelia Mann, tenant organizer with Building and Strengthening Tenant Action (BASTA), said. “People really don’t have any other options.”

A number of houses are crafted and cannot be moved. Caroline Velardie, a former tenant who grew up in the park and moved in earlier this summer, said many other tenants can’t afford the cost of moving their homes or have to wait for their homes to be approved for utilities. at Congress Mobile Home Park. People who left their homes in the park after moving into apartments now risk losing them entirely or being forced to sell them at significant financial loss as they are pushed back from ownership to the rental market.

“It’s so wrong,” Mann said, “not just the neglect and disinterest, but actually the desire to see these people kicked out. I think that represents the kind of Austin that some people want to see. , which I think is a gentrified Austin, which is a white Austin, a wealthy Austin – and it’s at the direct expense of people’s lives, a roof over people’s heads and food on Table.”

Velardie said that since moving, she and her sister have stopped going out to eat and try to keep their lights off at all times to save money on their electricity bill. In addition to higher utility costs, their rent has increased by $1,000 per month in their new apartment. Velardie said she hopes the lawsuit sends a message to other potential investors.

“Now when I go to the park, I find myself sighing a lot,” Velardie said. “I hate to see how my neighborhood was and what it’s become, and how ugly it’s gotten in the sense that Reza Paydar hasn’t improved that transition much… This is the new reality. You’re leaving with this frustration that we were being treated that way, like disposable people.”

Do you have something to say ? The the Chronicle welcomes opinion pieces on any topic from the community. Submit yours now at austinchronicle.com/opinion.

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Special order casts doubt on congressional intelligence briefing https://citruscongress2012.org/special-order-casts-doubt-on-congressional-intelligence-briefing/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 20:19:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/special-order-casts-doubt-on-congressional-intelligence-briefing/ SState Intelligence Committee Chairman Mark Warner (D-VA) has expressed doubts whether Congress will soon receive a briefing from the intelligence community about the damage resulting from classified documents found at the resort town. of former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago. The Virginia Democrat cited a judge’s approval of Trump’s motion for a special lead review of […]]]>

SState Intelligence Committee Chairman Mark Warner (D-VA) has expressed doubts whether Congress will soon receive a briefing from the intelligence community about the damage resulting from classified documents found at the resort town. of former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago.

The Virginia Democrat cited a judge’s approval of Trump’s motion for a special lead review of documents, which ordered investigators to stop using seized material for a criminal investigation, after which prosecutors said the intelligence community had been forced to suspend its national security risk assessment.

“I understand there is a question due to the special appointment of the judge in Florida, if they can inform at this point,” he said on CBS News on Sunday. Confront the Nation. “We need clarification on this from this judge as soon as possible, as it is essential that the leadership of the intelligence committee receive at least a briefing on the damage assessment.”

He added that while the specific details of the confiscated documents are still unknown, any mishandled intelligence could put the sources at risk.

WHY TRUMP’S SPECIAL MASTER COURT VICTORY MAY BE SHORT-LIFE

“The vice president and I have requested a briefing on the damage that could have resulted from mishandling this information, and I think it’s our duty in Congress to have that oversight,” Warner said. “Remember, what’s at stake here is the fact that if some of these documents involve human intelligence, and that information comes out, [people] will die. If there were signals intelligence penetration, literally years of work could be destroyed.”

U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon granted Trump’s request for a special master despite opposition from the Justice Department, and both sides have since made proposals on how to move forward, including candidates, access and timeliness of third-party review. The Justice Department said it would appeal the order granting an independent review and asked the Florida judge to issue an emergency order to allow investigators to continue using classified documents due to security concerns. national security for the duration of the appeal.

Warner stressed that he was not interested in previewing an active investigation, but instead wanted to exercise Congress’ watchdog functions – in this case, to assess whether there was any damage done to the “intelligence gathering and secrets maintenance capability”.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

“It’s an assessment of damages that, frankly, even the Florida judge said, can go on,” he said. “I may not agree with the Florida judge’s decision, but I respect our Department of Justice. I respect the FBI. I think they are trying in extremely difficult circumstances to get it right, and we owe them the benefit of the doubt.”

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26/11 Hero Recounts Horror of Mumbai’s Taj Hotel Siege: I Lost Everything https://citruscongress2012.org/26-11-hero-recounts-horror-of-mumbais-taj-hotel-siege-i-lost-everything/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 02:06:06 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/26-11-hero-recounts-horror-of-mumbais-taj-hotel-siege-i-lost-everything/ Terrorists killed several people at the Taj Hotel during the three-day siege in November 2008 New York: Karambir Kang, who was general manager of the Taj hotel in Mumbai when the 26/11 terrorist attacks took place, called on the international community to act against terrorism and seek justice for the victims who lost their lives […]]]>

Terrorists killed several people at the Taj Hotel during the three-day siege in November 2008

New York:

Karambir Kang, who was general manager of the Taj hotel in Mumbai when the 26/11 terrorist attacks took place, called on the international community to act against terrorism and seek justice for the victims who lost their lives in the attack. the attack.

While speaking at the first United Nations World Congress on Victims of Terrorism to pay tribute to victims around the world, Karambir Kang shared painful memories of the 26/11 attack, when he lost his family – his wife and two young sons.

“The whole world watched in horror when 10 terrorists attacked my country, my city and my hotel, the Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai where I was the General Manager. During the tragedy which continued for three long days and nights, more than 34 past lives have been lost,” Kang said.

“My wife and two young sons could not escape and perished during the attack, I lost everything. My staff members armed only with courage and the deep-rooted family culture, which represents TATA Group and Taj, resisted without any weapons, we lost many brave colleagues and this heroic act saved thousands of lives that night,” he added.

Mr. Kang went on to say that while the terrorists who entered the hotel met their fate, the people who planned it financed it and organized the attack remain free.

“While our company and staff have received global accolades, we have spent 14 long and painful years trying to get justice.”

He said: “Today I call on the international community to work together to seek justice domestically and across borders, as our own act of defying terrorism, we have opened the hotel which has been totally destroyed in 21 days.”

“Member states must join us and challenge and ensure that there is no safe haven for terrorists so that these heinous crimes do not have a chance to take root,” Kang said.

The first United Nations World Congress on Victims of Terrorism is being held from September 8-9 to pay tribute to victims of terrorism around the world, including the victims of the 26/11 terrorist attack in Mumbai.

The United Nations World Congress on Victims of Terrorism has been convened under the auspices of United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres at United Nations Headquarters in New York.

This Congress will provide a platform for victims of terrorism to directly share their experiences, challenges, stories of their resilience and contributions to society at large in a socially connected environment.

“Starting tomorrow @UN, the 1st #UN World Congress of Victims of Terrorism, September 8-9, will pay tribute to the victims of terrorism around the world, including the victims of the 26/11 terrorist attacks in Mumbai,” India tweeted at the UN.

According to the UN, the Congress will allow the public to learn about good practices undertaken by member states and civil society organizations, while ensuring that the voices of victims are heard and that their experiences shape the way. to follow in their own country and across borders.

The opening of the World Congress will feature high-level attendance, including UN Chief Guterres, Under-Secretary-General for Counter-Terrorism Vladimir Voronkov, co-chairs of the Group of Friends of Victims of Terrorism, the Republic of Iraq and the Kingdom of Spain, and other senior representatives of the United Nations and the international community, an official statement said earlier.

The following plenary and parallel sessions will feature speakers representing Member States, victims, victims’ associations, United Nations entities, civil society organizations, experts, academics and the private sector.

The program of the World Congress includes six main themes reflecting the rights and needs attributed to victims of terrorism.

The themes are: Recognition and Remembrance; Situation analysis: the changing nature of terrorism and the victims of terrorism; Protect the rights of victims of terrorism; Rehabilitation, assistance and support; Addressing the rights and needs of victims of terrorism with specific needs and access to justice for victims of terrorism.

Last month, UN Special Rapporteur Fionnuala Ni Aolain urged governments to adopt a human rights-based approach to victims of terrorism by positively and consistently affirming human rights. man of all victims.

“The International Day of Remembrance and Tribute to the Victims of Terrorism should serve as a call to action and a reminder that the commitments made to date must be implemented with immediate effect to ensure the realization of the rights of victims of terrorism,” Aolain said in a statement on the International Day of Remembrance and Tribute to Victims of Terrorism.

(Except for the title, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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Climate Activists in Congress: Kill the Manchin Side Deal https://citruscongress2012.org/climate-activists-in-congress-kill-the-manchin-side-deal/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 12:38:26 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/climate-activists-in-congress-kill-the-manchin-side-deal/ In late July, a broad coalition of grassroots activists from across Appalachia was working to file statements on the controversial Mountain Valley Pipeline before the public comment period expired. Just a month earlier, the pipeline developer had requested a four-year extension to its certificate to complete the project carrying fractured gas over more than 300 […]]]>

In late July, a broad coalition of grassroots activists from across Appalachia was working to file statements on the controversial Mountain Valley Pipeline before the public comment period expired. Just a month earlier, the pipeline developer had requested a four-year extension to its certificate to complete the project carrying fractured gas over more than 300 miles of farmland, mountains, rivers and streams. Organizers of local groups such as Protect our water, our heritage and our rights (POWHR)and Mountain Valley Watchwith the Sierra Club and 7 Departments of Service, mobilized to register the opposition to the extension request. This was the last round of their six-year campaign to stop the pipeline before it could be completed.

On July 27, two days before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s deadline for comment closed, a landmark investment in renewable energy and climate programs was announced. Once passed, the Cut Inflation Act would allocate billions of dollars to electrify the nation’s transportation system, support disadvantaged environmental justice communities, and invest in renewable energy systems. Many climate activists across the country celebrated the news.

But for those in the Appalachian states still battling the Mountain Valley Pipeline, news of the act came with a bitter pill to swallow: a reported handshake agreement between Sen. Joe Manchin and Democratic leaders who, among others , would legislate the completion of the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

“We were facing the FERC comment deadline, a very short window where people could make their voices heard that we don’t want this polluting pipeline in our backyards, and then the news broke,” said Russell Chisholm of Mountain Valley Watch. Sierra. “I spoke to many people affected that day and the days that followed, and many described it as a blow to me. The dominant feeling was one of betrayal.

Today, September 8, organizers will converge on Capitol Hill for a day of rallying and lobbying to try to sink the so-called Manchin side deal. “There is power in numbers,” said Crystal Cavalier, a resident of Mebane, North Carolina. Sierra. She is a co-founder of 7 Directions of Service and a longtime organizer against the Mountain Valley Pipeline, as well as a member of the Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation. “We are going to close this. We have a lot of people we network with and they will be in DC talking to their reps. We have buses scheduled to take people there from Virginia to West Virginia. When people show up in numbers, they can change their policy.

The Manchin side deal was not part of the final text of the Cut Inflation Act that President Joe Biden signed into law on August 16. But the news that Democratic leaders are considering the deal – and that the American Petroleum Institute not only lobbied for it, but actually authored the original draft— threw a wet blanket over the celebrations of the Inflation Reduction Act. The side deal, if passed, would overhaul the licensing process for oil and gas projects and undermine environmental reviews of such projects under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Although the Mountain Valley Pipeline is not explicitly named in the draft drafted by the American Petroleum Institute, projects like this would directly benefit if the language becomes law. Policymakers are expected to accept the deal when they return from recess this month.

Appalachian organizers believe they risk being sacrificed to carry out climate action. “I was furious,” Chisholm says. “Who else was at that negotiating table who thought this was a fair deal? We were certainly not in the room when this discussion took place. Other leaders in Congress and the White House were having these discussions and apparently thought it was a fair compromise. Well, we’re not going to be traded.

Since the hydraulic fracturing boom in the Marcellus Shale began more than a decade ago, fossil fuel companies have sought to route the gas produced there to power plants and plastics manufacturing complexes in other parts of the world. other regions of the country. Two major pipelines have been proposed to transport the gas: the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a 600-mile juggernaut that would have cut through forests from West Virginia to North Carolina as it zigzags down the Appalachian Trail; and the smaller but still important Mountain Valley Pipeline, a 303-mile bet to transport 2 billion cubic feet of fracked gas per day from Joe Manchin’s West Virginia through southern Virginia.

Community organizers along the proposed routes have fiercely opposed both projects, fearing the pipelines will damage national forests, affect water quality and endangered species, jeopardize public safety and allow the use of eminent domain to seize building land. In 2020, after years of litigation and organized resistance, the controlling company behind the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, Dominion Energy, announced it was pulling out of the project altogether.

But the Mountain Valley Pipeline resisted. And it left a trail of destruction in its wake.

The pipeline has been plagued with misfortune since its developer started digging. In 2019, the Commonwealth of Virginia filed a lawsuit against Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC for causing significant erosion in the southwestern portion of the state. The company lost the case and was ordered to pay a $2.5 million fine. This is just one example of dozens of documented cases of environmental destruction the construction of the pipeline contributed, in particular hundreds of water quality violations. Its construction route has a disproportionate impact on communities of color. In 2019, when concerns were raised that pipeline excavators had overlooked the presence of Indigenous burial mounds when mapping its route, the company described the burial mounds in a letter to FERC as being “a pile of stones”.

Photo courtesy of Crystal Mello

Six years after the pipeline was first proposed, it is now billions of dollars over budget and years behind. Despite its troubled history and long list of environmental violations, on August 23, FERC granted Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC the four extensions it sought to complete the project.

“We have shown time and time again that the gas that would come through this pipeline is not necessary,” said Kelly Sheehan, senior director of energy campaigns at the Sierra Club. “Now here is the Cut Inflation Act, which gives a big boost to clean energy saving in a way that further displaces any need for gas, electricity needs being met by solar and wind turbines and energy efficiency incentives are other reasons why this gas is not needed in our economy which is why Joe Manchin is trying to legislate his way into existence.

Manchin has received more political contributions from the oil and gas industry than any other member of the Senate. Pipeline companies like the one that built the Mountain Valley Pipeline donated $331,000 to Manchin this year alone.

The Cut Inflation Act represents a once-in-a-lifetime investment in renewable energy just as the United States faces the climate crisis. But the new law only addresses one side of the climate equation: While the law increases investment in clean energy, it does nothing to phase out civilization-threatening fossil fuel production. In fact, to make the law palatable to Manchin, the law guarantees drilling opportunities in Alaska and the Gulf of Mexico. Meanwhile, the Manchin side deal, if passed, would speed up polluting projects like the Mountain Valley pipeline.

Community organizers who applaud the Cut Inflation Act for its historic investment in clean energy and environmental justice say their land and homes, water and air must not be sacrificed in the name of climate progress .

“There are real lives at stake with this,” said Crystal Mellow, a community organizer with the POWHR Coalition. In addition to organizing, she also joined tree guardians to protest the route of the Mountain Valley Pipeline through her community. “We have been turned into a sacrifice zone. I understand that the Cut Inflation Act is great for many different reasons, such as reducing emissions and tax cuts for electric vehicles. But people in our community are not buying electric vehicles. They can’t afford it. So to pass this Manchin deal would be an insult.

“We don’t have much here,” continued Mellow. “What we have is a beautiful river and a beautiful landscape. We have clean air. Many of us don’t go to the Cascades to hike or to the beach. We go to the river down the road. We count the fireflies. We appreciate what we have here as a low income community. We may be lacking in resources in some ways, but we are rich in natural resources. We shouldn’t have to sacrifice what little we have.

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The challenges are piling up against the Peruvian president and his family https://citruscongress2012.org/the-challenges-are-piling-up-against-the-peruvian-president-and-his-family/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 18:35:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/the-challenges-are-piling-up-against-the-peruvian-president-and-his-family/ Comment this story Comment CARACAS, Venezuela – The surprise election of President Pedro Castillo has raised hopes for change in Peru’s unstable and corrupt political system, but the impoverished rural teacher and political neophyte has found himself so engulfed in the votes of impeachment and allegations of corruption that his presidency has become an exercise […]]]>

Comment

CARACAS, Venezuela – The surprise election of President Pedro Castillo has raised hopes for change in Peru’s unstable and corrupt political system, but the impoverished rural teacher and political neophyte has found himself so engulfed in the votes of impeachment and allegations of corruption that his presidency has become an exercise in political survival.

The chances that the left-wing leader could accomplish a signature policy such as improving education or health care were initially slim, given his lack of support in Congress, and evaporated as he focuses on keeping his family in power and freedom.

In just over a year as president, Castillo has survived two congressional votes to oust him, appointed more than 60 ministers to the 19 agencies that make up his cabinet, and faced six criminal investigations into charges ranging from influence peddling to plagiarism, one which recently saw a close relative jailed. Investigations are in their early stages and no formal charges have been filed.

Castillo says he hasn’t had “a single minute of truce” since taking office and blames Peru’s political elite for wanting him out.

“I don’t talk like them, I don’t sit at these opulent tables like them,” he told people gathered in an isolated desert community. He later told a group of mothers outside a recently restored school that he was from the lower class and that the charges would not “break” him.

But Castillo’s tribulations follow a pattern in Peru, which recently had three different presidents in a single week after one was impeached by Congress and protests forced his successor to resign. Almost all of Peru’s former presidents who have ruled since 1985 have been ensnared by corruption allegations, with some jailed or arrested in their homes. One of them committed suicide before the police could arrest him. Castillo defeated the daughter of one of those presidents, Alberto Fujimori, in last year’s election.

Prosecutors’ preliminary investigations against Castillo are a first for a sitting president in Peru, as is the preventive detention of his sister-in-law following money laundering allegations.

Peru’s constitution does not specifically say whether a sitting president can be investigated for crimes, and over the past two decades attorneys general have offered to open initial investigations into three interim presidents. One against then-president Martín Vizcarra was opened in October 2020, but the attorney general immediately froze it until the end of the presidential term.

Now, however, there is a new attorney general, Patricia Benavides, who has promised to go “after the investigation of any criminal act, whether by the most powerful citizen or any ordinary citizen”.

When he took office, Castillo faced not only a fragmented Congress and his own political inexperience, but also a wary elite antagonized by controversial campaign promises that included the nationalization of key industries.

Castillo was a rural schoolteacher in Peru’s third poorest district before moving to the presidential palace. His only leadership experience before becoming president was leading a teachers’ strike in 2017.

This inexperience casts doubt on whether he is the “ringleader” of the bribery scheme, as critics claim.

“Having said that, you can’t look at Castillo’s file and say, ‘Hey, this guy is being honest. So how do we put them together? said Cynthia McClintock, a political science professor at George Washington University who has studied Peru extensively. “My feeling is that part of him doesn’t quite understand how careful he has to be. Did he just think that’s the way you do business? It’s not clear at this stage.

Five of the investigations against Castillo relate to what prosecutors describe as a criminal network run by the president involving influence peddling and other crimes. A sixth investigation accuses him and his wife of having plagiarized their master’s theses about ten years ago.

One case concerns a contract won by a group of businessmen in 2021 to build a bridge. Authorities say an informant claims former transportation minister Juan Silva told them late last year that Castillo was “happy” when he received $12,900 after the contract was awarded. Silva is considered a fugitive.

In another case, prosecutors allege that Castillo, his former personal secretary and a former defense minister asked for the promotion of several military or police officers because the moves would bring them money. Authorities say they have statements from former army chief José Vizcarra saying he was pressured to promote military personnel close to the government.

Authorities also suspect Castillo of obstructing justice for firing an interior minister who had set up a team to capture Silva and one of the president’s nephews, who is also linked to the investigation into the contract of bridge.

“Ideally, the president would resign,” Peruvian congress leader Lady Camones said last month. “He was asked to do it… That would be the ideal scenario. But let’s hope in any case that the evaluation is made by the president.

In a separate preliminary investigation, agents from the prosecutor’s office entered the presidential palace in Lima last month to arrest Yenifer Paredes, Castillo’s sister-in-law, whom he raised and considers his daughter. They searched under Castillo’s bed and in the closets in the presidential bedroom, according to a research report obtained by The Associated Press.

Paredes surrendered a day later. A judge then ruled she could be detained until February 2025 while authorities investigate her alleged involvement in money laundering.

“They don’t mind breaking up the family. They don’t mind leaving our children orphans, a situation was designed to break us,” Castillo said.

Paredes’ attorney, José Dionicio, said prosecutors had no evidence against his client.

Historian Charles Walker, director of the Hemispheric Institute on the Americas at the University of California, Davis, said Castillo’s position is a reflection of the entrenched corruption that surrounds the government and a relentless opposition that has the feeling of losing power.

“It’s a perfectly miserable storm,” Walker said. “It seems that around him there is a circle of people who get contracts, who do stupid things, I mean classic, almost traditional corruption.

“But on the other hand, you have this right that feels like it’s under siege in Vietnam, that the ultra-left has taken over…and there’s this incredible paranoia. I think that requires almost a psychological explanation as most of their advantages are still intact; the elite economy is doing quite well.

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September is Suicide Prevention Month, Tell Congress We Can #StopSuicide | Opinions https://citruscongress2012.org/september-is-suicide-prevention-month-tell-congress-we-can-stopsuicide-opinions/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/september-is-suicide-prevention-month-tell-congress-we-can-stopsuicide-opinions/ Dear Editor, September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. As a volunteer advocate for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, I call on my members of Congress to pass legislation to prevent suicides and support crisis care. I myself have lost a loved one to suicide, and I know how prevalent it is in our […]]]>

Dear Editor,

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. As a volunteer advocate for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, I call on my members of Congress to pass legislation to prevent suicides and support crisis care.

I myself have lost a loved one to suicide, and I know how prevalent it is in our community, and also how often it goes unaddressed, especially among teenagers.

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline must be sustainably funded so that confidential, voluntary services by trained counselors are accessible. HR7116, the 988 Implementation Act, would provide federal funding and state guidance for 988 crisis services across the country.

An alternative to 911 for mental health crises, 988 connects callers to Lifeline centers. These centers defuse 98% of crisis calls without dispatching emergency services. Well-resourced crisis support systems can connect callers with local resources, including someone to talk to (call centres), someone to respond to (mobile crisis teams ) and a place to go (crisis stabilization centers). We must ensure that every state has the capacity to provide comprehensive crisis response services to help save lives.

For more information, visit afsp.org/988.

Join me in urging Congress to take action to #StopSuicide!

Sincerely,

Taylor Hawthorne

Herndon

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Charlie Crist quits Congress to focus on gubernatorial race https://citruscongress2012.org/charlie-crist-quits-congress-to-focus-on-gubernatorial-race/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 12:27:12 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/charlie-crist-quits-congress-to-focus-on-gubernatorial-race/ Democratic candidate for governor charlie christ leaves the United States House of Representatives as the general election heats up. Crist, who has represented Florida’s 13th congressional district since winning the seat in the 2016 election, told the Tampa Bay Weather that serving in the House was “an honor and a privilege”. He highlighted his work […]]]>

Democratic candidate for governor charlie christ leaves the United States House of Representatives as the general election heats up.

Crist, who has represented Florida’s 13th congressional district since winning the seat in the 2016 election, told the Tampa Bay Weather that serving in the House was “an honor and a privilege”. He highlighted his work for veterans, solar initiatives and community fundraising.

Crist had served in Congress throughout the primary campaign against the agriculture commissioner Fried Nikki, relying on a proxy voting mechanism that drew Republican criticism long before he secured the nomination. A spokesperson for the Republican Governors Association earlier this month called his use of proxies a “flagrant violation of ethics and a complete disrespect for his constituents.” The Times article counted 107 different proxy votes between January and April.

Current Govt Ron DeSantis faced the same decision to resign from Congress in 2018 and, like Crist, waited until he secured his party’s nomination in the gubernatorial race. DeSantis resigned on September 10 of the same year.

“This is not a decision I take lightly,” DeSantis noted in 2018 when announcing his decision to leave Congress.

“As a Republican candidate for governor of Florida, it is clear to me that I will likely miss the vast majority of our remaining session days for this Congress. Under these circumstances, it would be inappropriate for me to accept a salary,” DeSantis wrote in a letter to the then president. Paul Ryan.

DeSantis served voters in Florida’s 6th congressional district. According to GovTrack, which tracks Congress, DeSantis has missed 4.2% of roll call votes since January 2013, but the percentage jumped to 53.8% from July to his resignation.

Prior to that, DeSantis had spent much of the 2016 cycle racing for At Marco Rubio’s Seated in the Senate as Rubio ran for president. DeSantis eventually returned to his House seat when Rubio reversed course and ran for the Senate again after dropping his bid for the White House.

We’ve reached out to the Crist and DeSantis campaigns for comment on recent developments, and will update as appropriate.

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Ryan Nicol of Florida Politics contributed to this article.


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Appointment made to Congressional Elementary School District Board https://citruscongress2012.org/appointment-made-to-congressional-elementary-school-district-board/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 20:15:30 +0000 https://citruscongress2012.org/appointment-made-to-congressional-elementary-school-district-board/ Open the audio article player By Personal | on August 29, 2022 By Yavapai County Educational Services Agency The CAST 11 podcast network is sponsored by the Prescott Valley Outdoor Summit. Where adventure comes together. Yavapai County School Superintendent Tim Carter is pleased to announce the appointment of Cathy Campbell to the Elementary Congressional District […]]]>

The CAST 11 podcast network is sponsored by the Prescott Valley Outdoor Summit. Where adventure comes together.

Yavapai County School Superintendent Tim Carter is pleased to announce the appointment of Cathy Campbell to the Elementary Congressional District Board of Trustees.

Congress Elementary School District, Board of Trustees, Yavapai County School Superintendent, Congress,

This vacancy was due to the resignation of board member Sheri Milner, who resigned for personal reasons. We greatly appreciate the service Mrs. Milner has provided to the school and the community.

Since the resignation occurred during an election cycle, Superintendent Carter held the position vacant until the election process could yield a successor.

There was one qualified non-incumbent candidate for the seat, who is being nominated. Ms. Campbell was willing to start the term early and take this acting appointment until December 31, 2022, and then begin the term for which she was selected on January 1, 2023.

Superintendent Carter said, “It was good that the electoral process made the selection in this case.” Mrs. Campbell will do well and the fact that she was willing to start her service early is greatly appreciated”.

The appointment will be effective upon taking the oath and will expire on December 31, 2022.

Read more education stories at Signals A Z.com.


Prescott Valley Outdoor Summit

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